How To Watch All The Election Night Action Without A TV

Happy Election Eve! We are almost through what has felt like the longest, most embattled, and completely unprecedented presidential campaign season of all time.

Tomorrow's first priority: Vote! After you get that "I Voted" sticker, keep up with on-the-minute results as votes start rolling in. The most substantial coverage will begin around 6 p.m. EST when polls start closing, but you can catch all day commentary and news right here. Want to track the numbers from multiple sources? All of these sites and apps will keep you on top of polling information.
YouTube
If you want to see how multiple news organizations are covering results, YouTube is the place to go. The site will live-stream coverage from NBC, Telemundo, Bloomberg, MTV, and PBS starting at 7 p.m. EST.

Google
Still have questions about your nearest polling place? Google the location. When polls close tomorrow night, just search "election results" to take a quick glance at what's happening in the presidential, congressional, senatorial, and gubernatorial races.
Twitter
Buzzfeed will be live streaming election coverage on Twitter starting on 6 p.m. EST. As with any broadcast on Twitter, you can read tweeted reactions alongside the coverage, which can be both insightful and disturbing at the same time.

Facebook
ABC News is Facebook's official election day partner. Go here to watch correspondents and Good Morning America's Michael Strahan offer their takes on the results. Refinery29's own Facebook Live coverage will kick off here at 8 p.m. EST.

2016 Map
The 2016 Map app will give you the visual on exactly which states go blue and which go red.

News Organizations
According to CNET, NBC, Fox, ABC, and CNN will all stream election results on-site, no cable credentials required.

Polls for critical battleground states, including Florida and Pennsylvania close at 7 p.m. EST and 8 p.m. EST, respectively, but it can take hours and sometimes days for all the votes to be tallied. If past years as any indication, the presidential concession speech may come shortly after midnight. According to the Financial Times, that's when both John McCain in 2008 and Mitt Romney in 2012, gave theirs.

Let your attempts to quell election day anxiety begin — post-election day massage, anyone?
Advertisement