The Body Image Problem The CrossFit Community Rarely Talks About

When you think of strong women, you likely think of people like CrossFit athlete Jamie Hagiya. Her 45,000 Instagram followers know her for her videos of intense training sessions and incredible weight-lifting. But Hagiya, like so many other women (CrossFit athletes or otherwise), isn't immune to the pressures to look a certain way or have a certain type of body.

On Tuesday, Hagiya posted a photo of herself in a bikini, along with a caption about learning to love her body.

"I've come to the realization that this is my body," she wrote. "I work my ass off in training every day. I eat clean for the most part, but am human and love to indulge in dessert every now and then. I'm in the best shape of my life and still don't have a six pack. Not even close to a 4 lol."
In her post, Hagiya says some of this is because of "genetics," but a large part comes down to this fact: In order to perform, she needs fuel. "I can't worry about trying to look like a 'Games' athlete because having a six pack doesn't always make for the best athlete," she wrote, referring to the CrossFit Games, which are like the Olympics for CrossFit athletes.

If you've ever checked out the Games, it's worth noting that many of the women competing have insane six-packs (and sometimes even eight-packs). It's the "prototype" body for the games.

But Hagiya's Instagram brings up an important truth: There is no one type of body for any sport. There isn't any one way to be or look powerful. Look at Serena Williams, who's been outspoken about loving her body in spite of the unfair criticism she's faced for not fitting the "normal" slim physique for a woman in tennis.
Hagiya closed her post by saying, "So for anyone who thinks they need to look a certain way to be a Regionals or Games competitor, you don't. Stay on the grind and keep doing you!"

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