This Online Artist Leaked Her Own Sexts & Nudes So No One Else Had To (NSFW)

Photo: Courtesy of Molly Soda.
"I’m a bit of an over-sharer online," explains digital artist Molly Soda. Her latest project, a zine of sexts, poems, and nude photos taken on her own phone, would make it seem like she applies this mantra to all areas of her life, but Soda says she's always been wary of sharing that kind of suggestive content. "I don’t send nude photographs to anyone because I’m afraid they will get leaked or that someone will have some kind of power over me. I’d never want to feel that way."

"I think that everyone takes the occasional nude. My thing is that I never intend to send them to anyone," she says, adding that "actually, half the time I just delete them." So this project, entitled Should I Send This?, is rather out of the norm for Soda. More accurately, this work shows her exercising her right to reveal her more vulnerable side the way she sees fit. Here's how she puts it:

"I believe if you’re embarrassed about something or you feel a little bit shy or weird about something, the best way to deal with it...is to put it out there and let it exist...I wanted to use things that I was even a little bit apprehensive or shy about...I felt like I had a lot of text or poems on my phone, and I was like, 'Oh, I don’t really want to post these anywhere. It’s a little too emo. It doesn’t really feel right.' So I decided to make the zine in order to deal with those feelings."

When asked about how the nude photos fit into the zine, she says, simply, "I don’t send nudes to anyone, so I kind of wanted to just leak them myself."

Click ahead to view a selection of Soda's texts and photographs. The full zine is available online, here. You can purchase a physical copy, here.
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Photo: Courtesy of Molly Soda.
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Photo: Courtesy of Molly Soda.
"I think the reason I don’t send nude photographs to anyone is because I’m afraid they will get leaked or that someone will have some kind of power over me. I’d never want to feel that way."
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Photo: Courtesy of Molly Soda.
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Photo: Courtesy of Molly Soda.
"I think I actually have a harder time feeling intimate with people in my real life than I do with people on the internet."
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Photo: Courtesy of Molly Soda.
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Photo: Courtesy of Molly Soda.
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Photo: Courtesy of Molly Soda.
"There’s this weird thing where there’s less rejection online, just because people can tune in and respond to you whenever you put anything out there.

"If I’m feeling upset or I’m feeling a certain way or I want to feel validated or I want to feel loved or supported, I can put something out there on the internet, and, yeah, I’ll get hateful comments, but there’s also this influx of support that may be harder for me to gain in real life — which I know isn’t true. Everyone has friends and their own support system. But it almost feels safer for me, personally, to use the internet for that."
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Photo: Courtesy of Molly Soda.
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Photo: Courtesy of Molly Soda.
"I’m existing in my body the way that I’d like to exist in my body. I’m not here to subvert anyone’s [beauty] standards. Because, when it boils down to it, I’m still a petite white woman. I’m not doing that much. Like, okay, yeah, I have some hair on my stomach. That’s cool, but I really don’t think that should be shocking to anyone at this point...I don’t want people to elevate me to something I’m not."
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Photo: Courtesy of Molly Soda.
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Photo: Courtesy of Molly Soda.
"I’ve had a lot of people talk to me about how they can relate to the zine. I think that, actually, it’s been one of my pieces that more people have told me that they related to it [or] that they felt connected to it in some way, which is great. I think that’s awesome."
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Photo: Courtesy of Molly Soda.
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