10 Celebs You Never Knew Were In Afterschool Specials

Photo: ABC/Getty Images.
ABC Afterschool Specials didn't put out any new episodes after the mid-90s, but their legacy lives on. Informing the comical awfulness of Very Special Episodes and television gems like 7th Heaven's take on the demon marijuana, they made serious, important issues wonderfully goofy. Pot can lead to tragic rowboat accidents. Harder stuff can lead to attempts to fly (possible), which will then lead to "tough love" speeches over your broken body (unlikely). Yet, these lengthy PSAs were anything but career killers. Teenage Michelle Pfeiffer and Helen Hunt star as troubled youth. A tiny Ben Affleck and Sean Astin make appearances, too. The youth of today may have reruns of Glee and Degrassi to help them navigate adolescence, but their parents had a shirtless Rob Lowe dealing with childcare.
1 of 10
Melissa Sue Anderson in Very Good Friends (1977)

It's weird to see Anderson without a prairie dress. This special has a dual purpose: pro-grieving together and anti-tree climbing.
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2 of 10
Rob Lowe in Schoolboy Father (1980)

In this supernatural thriller, babies follow Rob Lowe everywhere, and he needs repeated confirmation that pregnancy lasts for nine months. Teen Lowe is reunited with his summer love when she takes an ad out in the paper to announce the birth of their baby. (This was to annoy her dad, which probably worked spectacularly).
3 of 10
Scott Baio in Stoned (1980)

Parents, it's very easy to tell if your child is into drugs. Have they ditched their button down and glasses? They might be a stoner. Luckily, you'll know they've gone back to their straightedge ways when their wardrobe returns to normal.
4 of 10
Sean Astin in Please Don't Hit Me, Mom (1981)

There's nothing funny about child abuse, but everything's funny about early-80s fashion. Sean Astin (a.k.a. the best friend a hobbit could ask for) plays the part of an abused child, opposite his real-life mom, Patty Duke. This is probably where his therapy sessions would start.
5 of 10
James Earl Jones in Amy and the Angel (1982)

I'm not sure throwing celestial beings into a series that was meant to deliver important, real-life facts was the best move.
6 of 10
Helen Hunt in Desperate Lives (1983)

From the pot glossary to the teacher giving a climatic lecture over the bleeding, unconscious body of her student, everything about this clip is amazing.
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7 of 10
Cynthia Nixon in It's No Crush, I'm In Love (1983)

Here, we have the obvious prequel to Sex and the City. I think the moral of this special is suppose to be: "Don't get hung up on a fantasy." It actually should be: "You can't date your teacher, and stalking is bad."
8 of 10
Michelle Pfeiffer in One Too Many (1985)

You should not drive drunk. You should prevent drunk friends from getting behind the wheel. And, you know what you definitely should not do? Run directly in front of a car whose driver you know for a fact is drunk.
9 of 10
Ben Affleck in Wanted: The Perfect Guy (1986)

Baby Ben Affleck! Obviously, this is where the Olsen twins got the inspiration for Billboard Dad.
10 of 10
Marisa Tomei in Supermom's Daughter (1987)

This is quite possibly the most innocuous rebellion ever. I want to read nursery rhymes and help teach the future!
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