These Awesomely Weird Wrapped Sneakers Could Change Everything

Photo: Via Furoshiki-shoes.jp.
There are few things worse than shoes that straight-up abuse your feet, no matter how many Band-Aids, insoles, or anti-chafe balms are used to try to stop the hobbling. Crippling flats or sneakers seem to be the biggest offenders. But that's about to change. At last, the antithesis to every evil pair of shoes that have ever hurt you has arrived: Vibram’s Furoshiki shoes.

Inspired by — and named for — a traditional Japanese wrapping cloth used to package and schlep stuff around, the shoes have no laces. Instead, their stretchy fabric panels are welded to a rubber sole and wrapped around the foot. The kicks, which were created by Japanese designer Masaya Hashimoto, can be worn with or without socks.

“The stretch fabric allows the upper to fit almost all foot types due to the anatomical shape of the sole. The shoe goes on and off in seconds, allowing it to be used for all types of activities,” Chris Melton, director of sales and distribution at Vibram, told us. The futuristic-looking shoes can be worn during barre or Pilates classes for more grip, or when traveling, since Furoshikis “allow your foot to be relaxed and at ease,” according to Melton. Also, since they're easy to remove, they'd more than likely make TSA experiences less annoying.
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Photo: Via Furoshiki-shoes.jp.


While the 78-year-old Italian brand's claim to fame is its signature, industrial-strength rubber soles, some might also recognize Vibram for its FiveFingers style, a barefoot-running shoe that features separate toe slots and a grip-y sole made from a proprietary rubber compound called WaveGrip. That same compound is being used for the Furoshikis, which are currently being sold on Vibram’s Japanese site for $110.

These shoes are definitely strange, but we’re kind of getting some Stella McCartney for Adidas vibes. And if you’ve been dying to add something denim to your shoe repertoire, well, this is your chance…
Photo: Via Furoshiki-shoes.jp.
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