How To Do Black Tie When You Want To Dance Your Face Off

Photo: Patrick McMullan.
When you RSVP yes to a party hosted by a bunch of dancers, you ought not pick an outfit that doesn't let you move. So, when the New York City Ballet invites you to one of the biggest parties of the year to kick off its new performance season, the same rules apply. At last night’s annual Spring Gala, we couldn’t help but notice how many outfits were not only made for moving, but had ballet in mind to begin with.

The mark of a dance-your-face-off design is in its silhouette. Will it shimmy when you shimmy? Will it prevent you from bending your knees? To celebrate the start of the NYC Ballet’s newest season, and the premiere of the Danish ballet La Sylphide, the red carpet responded with looks as pretty as the ones on stage, and nearly as functional, too. Perhaps the outfits ahead aren't quite perpared to perform a pas de deux, but at the very least they were perfect for cheering one on. 
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Photo: Patrick McMullan.
Olivia Palermo’s floral creation is the stuff of dreams — a.k.a. Valentino. While the long layers might appear to make moving tricky, we'd say ethereal tulle such as this is made for nothing but twirling around. (Just ask the professional dancers.)
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Photo: Patrick McMullan.
Someone came ready to bust a move. By “someone,” we mean stylist June Ambrose. And, by “ready,” we mean that incredible sculptural skirt can double as her own personal dance circle.
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Photo: Patrick McMullan.
The most dance-ready part of Indre Rockefeller’s outfit is hard to tell in this photo, but the bottom half of her gorgeous Delpozo set is actually a pair of pants. (Get a better look on designer Josef Font’s Instagram.)
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Photo: Patrick McMullan.
There is perhaps no material as movement-friendly as fringe. Here, Rachel Roy piled it on in long lengths and a bright-blue shade.
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Photo: Patrick McMullan.
Elettra Wiedemann, R29’s own executive food editor, opted for a minimal Lanvin design with a color choice and deep neckline reminiscent of another ballerina staple: the leotard.
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Photo: Patrick McMullan.
Okay, Mischa Barton’s printed dress-and-robe combination doesn't really have an obvious dance element. But, we're really into the idea of a layered look that gives you both the ability to move the extra fabric around as a dance prop, and to remove the outer shell when things heat up.
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