6 Things To Know About OS X Yosemite, Apple's Newest Operating System

Today in San Francisco at the Worldwide Developers Conference, Apple unveiled two new updates to its software family. Along with the upcoming iOS 8, there's a new operating system for Mac computers.
Goodbye, OS X Mavericks. Hello, OS X Yosemite.
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At first glance, the new OS might appear to be only an aesthetic upgrade to Mavericks, taking design cues from iOS 7. But, it's far more than that. Available in the fall — or this summer for users who sign up online for the beta version — OS X Yosemite includes a slew of new features that aim to align the experiences of using a computer and a mobile device.
Click through to see a preview of the new OS.
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Photo: Courtesy of Apple.
The look and feel will remind you a lot of iOS 7, but there are differences, too. Many Finder panels are now translucent, and the menus also include a "dark mode" option.
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Photo: Courtesy of Apple.
While Mavericks already allowed you to send and receive text messages to iPhone users through iMessage, Yosemite will let you send and receive texts from anyone. Not only that, but the service has been expanded to phone calls. Yes, your computer is now a speakerphone.
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Photo: Courtesy of Apple.
Notifications and Calendar have been updated with a new "Today" view, which shows you any upcoming events, along with reminders, messages, email, weather, and other widgets (including third-party ones) that can be moved in an out of your Notifications stream.

There's also a new Spotlight search feature, which goes beyond rooting around in your Mac for apps or documents; it trawls the Web to find what you're looking for.
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Photo: Courtesy of Apple.
A new feature called Markup offers a menu of drawing tools within Apple apps, like Mail and Safari, that allows you to annotate and sign documents, and add comments and arrows to photos — no Photoshop necessary.
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Photo: Courtesy of Apple.
You can tether your phone to your Mac now, too. That's not an entirely novel feature, but the way it works is new. Instead of fiddling with settings on your mobile to set it up as a Wi-Fi hotspot, your Mac will automatically (and wirelessly) tap into your phone's network connection to get online.
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Photo: Courtesy of Apple.
No more file-size warnings: Apple has introduced a Dropbox-style service called MailDrop that allows you to upload attachments up to 5 GB in size to the cloud. (Apple users will get the attachment as usual, with MailDrop acting as an intermediary; users on other platforms will receive a link to download the files you've sent.)

In addition, the existing AirDrop feature has been expanded to allow you to transfer images and documents between your iDevices and your Mac without a cable.
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