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Dog Hates His Haircut, Stands On Hind Legs In Protest

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    When I was a tween, I envied the boys on the swim team who had bleach parties and fried their hair follicles. So, one Friday night, after a trip to Wegmans, I put a bottle to my head and took my hair-bleaching virginity. My brunette locks did not lift to reveal white-blond; it turned orange — and brittle. My mother was unimpressed. I was depressed and was forced to buzz the damaged mane (and whatever lick of dignity remained) away. So, when this series of images showing an angry pomeranian pup standing on its hind legs, pissed that his hair was shaved off surfaced, I nodded and whispered to the dog, "I get you."

    According to ancient digital lore, Jin Dan the Pomeranian promptly stood up on his legs after seeing what his human had done with his fluffy coat. Surely if dogs had fingers, Jin Dan would've given his human — who has yet to come forward — the finger. Instead, he growled and streaked through the house. "You shaved me naked, human. Now you must live with me naked!"

    In the human's defense, Jin Dan would make a wonderful Boo The Dog stand-in had the cut been done right. Perhaps that was the human's goal the whole time. Plus, Jin Dan's little wardrobe looks a lot better on his shaved body than my meager collection of beanies I hid under. Though hair/fur grows back, the viral doggy makeover will likely remain. Now Jin Dan's a brand. But, from one hair-loss veteran to another: Nights alone in your room, lip-synching Lady Gaga's ode to the mane "Hair," is as cathartic as it sounds. You're as free as your hair, Jin Dan. Paws up (literally). (Gawker)

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