6 Home Decor Rules To Break Now

It only took one (sneak) peek at this Brooklyn Heights office space for us to see that the folks at Homepolish — the interior geniuses responsible for the streamlined makeover — know what they're doing. Whether it's a total renovation or culling the perfect finishing touches, designer work by the hour to create a balanced space that just works.
Much like fashion, when it comes to interior design, some rules are meant to be broken. At some point or another, you’ve probably been told that black and navy don’t mix, or blue and green should never be seen.
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Well, it’s high time we throw out those outdated, old-school rules. With the right approach, the following combinations can make a big statement. "Never be afraid to take a chance," says Homepolish Designer Amanda Gorski. "If you're still unsure, you can always seek professional advice. That's what we're here for!"
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Rule 1: Blue & Green Should Never Be Seen

“Blue and green can work beautifully together if chosen wisely," says Homepolish Designer Orlando Soria. "To do this, you're going to need to test them out next to each other. Usually, a saturated green (not too acidic or muted) and a true blue (not skewing toward purple or periwinkle) look great together — just be careful to look at each hue in natural light since there are so many variants of both colors, not all of which look great next to each other. The key here is choosing the right types of blue and green, and don't be scared!”
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Photo: Courtesy of Homepolish.
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Photo: Courtesy of Homepolish.
Rule 2: Don’t Mix Black & Brown

“I love this color combination!" says Designer Katie Li. "Black and brown are timeless colors and can look incredibly chic together. The key is to break it up the black and brown elements in a room with white or cream (think cream throw pillows or white walls)."
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Rule 3: Never Pair Navy with Black

"My advice for people who want to mix navy, black, and white is to make sure the shades of navy and black they choose are distinct from one another," Orlando says. “There are so many different hues of black, and while some of them veer toward dark brown. others look closer to dark blue or purple. If you want to mix black and navy, make sure the black you choose is a true black (not too warm or too cool) and that the navy you choose is vibrant enough that it doesn't just look like a variant of black. The goal here is to make the color combination look intentional, which means the colors have to be easily distinguishable from each other. If you combine these colors correctly, they make a beautiful pairing.”
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Photo: Chellise Michael.
Rule 4: Avoid Multiple Metallics

“Despite what you may have heard, you can absolutely have contrasting metals — like brass and silver — in the same room,” says designer Katie Li.

“Be sure to have a good ratio," recommends Homepolish Designer Margaret Wenzel. "In other words, don’t decorate a room with silver and then add one random gold or brass item — it will look out of place. There should be a few items of each finish so it looks cohesive."
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Photo: Courtesy of Homepolish.
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Rule 5: Don’t Mix Prints

“Why leave the experimenting to your wardrobe? If you have a colorful and patterned chair or rug, take colors from those pieces, and search out a sofa in the same hue," says Homepolish Designer Amanda Gorski. "Then, add pillows and a throw in a complementary pattern. Having accessories that pick up on the colors you already have it helps tie things together.

"When I envision certain arrangements, colors, and patterns, I sometimes tell my clients to just trust me — I know it can sound a little crazy when you try to explain how all these different elements will fall into place." Amanda says.
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Photo: Courtesy of Homepolish.
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Rule 6: Avoid Monochrome

“Though it sounds counter-intuitive, using tone-on-tone colors in a room (like blue walls paired with blue drapes) allows you to put enough color in a room to make it feel warm and inviting, without making it feel cluttered,” says Danielle Arps.