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Happy Birthday, Tiffany! A Look At Your Amazing Life

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    You're never too old to celebrate a birthday — especially when your name is Tiffany & Co. and there are 175 candles on your cake to blow out. What started as a stationery and goods store in New York City back in 1837 has morphed into one of the world's leading diamond authorities and silversmiths. How could a company that dreamed up the engagement ring as we know it today (the six-prong Tiffany setting created in 1886) not be one of the coolest icons out there? And let's be honest, birthdays aside, there is never a bad occasion to unwrap one of the signature Tiffany blue boxes — like, never.

    The first Chicago store (and Midwest flagship) opened on Michigan Avenue back in 1966. We popped in last week to take a peek at the new Enchant collection, which was created to specifically celebrate Tiffany's glitzy 175-year history. While we turned down the offer to head into the private showroom to try on a piece or two (because parting is such sweet sorrow), we took a keen interest in learning about the different pieces that have made up the celebrated jeweler's colorful past.

    Take a tour through some of Tiffany's gorgeous contributions over the years through this historical click-through!


    Photo courtesy of Tiffany & Co.

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