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The Edible Selby Is Now In Your Kitchens (And Making Us Drool)

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    Admit it, you have a problem. Well, at least we do—we've gotten lost in a Selby-hole. If you're confused, we're talking about Todd Selby's eponymous site, The Selby Is In Your Place, which, if you've never hit the bottle, chronicles the photographer's shoots of amazing pads. Well now our voyeuristic side is getting a whole lot more pleasure thanks to his new site, The Edible Selby, an extension of his online column of the T Magazine of the same name. Slam X Hype got the scoop this morning, meaning we can now inhale guilt-free calories (you won't get lumpty-dumpty) by peeping these equally enticing vignettes—his camera spotlights the kitchens and culinary masterpieces of amazingly creative food people such as chefs Eric Werner and Mya Henry, Inaki Aizpitarte of the Parisian Le Chateaubriand and Le Dauphin, as well as Andrew Field of Rockaway Taco. Featuring adorable handwritten Q&A's in bright Crayola colors and DIY recipes of top-secret restaurant and bakery dishes, we wish The Edible Selby hadn't come out so close to summer (#swimsuitbody)—we're already hungry. What's for lunch?!

    Check out our slideshow for some favorite, or go on over to the site here to see them all.

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