L'Oréal Is Really Bummed There Aren't More Girls In Science



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We have to hand it to L'Oréal for bringing up a good point: Every tube of lipstick or palette of blush must be engineered, experimented upon, and strategically developed. So, says the cosmetic company, it's in their best interest to make sure those who are engineering, experimenting, and developing their products are top-notch. Ergo, L'Oréal aims to increase the amount of people who are interested in what they call S.T.E.M (science, technology, engineering, and math).

Yet, as any girl who has ever sat through a physics lecture may admit, the world of science isn't exactly teeming with female figures. Girls and young women are often engaged and interested in science, but research has shown that the industry doesn't often attract females. This is the idea behind L'Oréal's newest initiative, For Girls In Science, a web-based resource for girls and young women interested in those fields.

The site is a whole lot more than a L'Oréal-branded initiative. It offers profiles on women in the industry, Twitter profiles to follow, and even science jokes. (Yes. "Trigonometry is just a sine of the times." Ba-dum-tish!) We have to say, it's pretty inspiring to see fourth-grade girls geeking out over their science-fair wins.

True, gendering entire fields of study can be problematic, but for young girls who are familiar with L'Oréal products, the site feels welcoming, and it openly encourages pride in being right-brained. And, hey, loving make-up and loving science are certainly not mutually exclusive. Don't need to be an Einstein — or should we say, Marie Curie — to know that.

Photo: Courtesy of For Girls In Science