Men's Haircuts You HAVE To See

Photo: Courtesy of Anh Co Tran.
We all know a dude (or three) who needs a new haircut. Or, perhaps, nearly every dude you know needs a new haircut. Maybe you're even one of those dudes. Of course, this probably doesn't surprise you. Some may call it unfair, or sexist, but the haircut resources (read: inspiration) available for the men of the world are scant in comparison to the array of women's-hair looks adorning many Pinterest pages and screengrab folders. Is this a scientific, fact-backed claim we're making? No, but it's safe to say that men get the short end of the "new haircut" stick, at least from our perspective.
In an effort to help give visibility to some of the raddest barbers and stylists working today — and, let's not lie, help direct some of the aforementioned dudes to a cut well-suited for 2016 — we checked in with our favorite forward-thinking groomers from around the country and beyond.
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From L.A. to Nashville to London (and a few spots in-between), you'll find some of the best cuts to copy now, plus tips on how to style them at home. Oh, and while you're at it, go ahead and follow these barbers and stylists on Instagram. No harm in keeping the inspiration coming, if only to prove our above nonscientific claim wrong.
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Photo: Courtesy of Anh Co Tran.
Stylist/Barber: Anh Co Tran
Find Him At: Ramirez|Tran, Los Angeles

What To Ask For: A classic men's cut that’s shorter on the sides and longer on top

“This is a timeless gentleman's cut,” Tran tells us. “[It’s] just short enough and long enough.” To score the look with your stylist or barber, Tran suggests asking for a classic men's cut "with a modern technique to prolong the shape." That is, be sure that the top is a bit longer than the sides and the ends are texturized, which will allow you to go up to six weeks without a trim.

To style it, he suggests using a gel, a pomade, or, ideally, an equal mixture of the two, which will allow for a soft, pliable result.
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Photo: Courtesy of Sal Salcedo.
Stylist/Barber: Sal Salcedo
Find Him At: Ramirez|Tran, Los Angeles

What To Ask For: An undercut with a gradual fade on the sides and a long, textured top

“I describe this haircut as a modern '90s cut,” Salcedo says. Ask for undercut sides and length on the top (long enough to move around), he says. Then, “style the top by wetting the hair and then towel-drying, and finish off by adding a fiber to the hair,” he tells us. To finish, just push hair into place and let it air-dry without touching it. Expect to get it touched up every month: “The key is to keep the sides tight — that's what gives it the modern feel,” Salcedo says.
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Photo: Courtesy of Robert McMillen.
Stylist/Barber: Robert McMillen
Find Him At: Blind Barber, New York City

What To Ask For: A classic hair part with a bald fade

“This cut would be considered a classic hair part, or pompadour,” McMillen tells us, noting that what makes it cool is the shortness of the sides. To get this look, ask for the sides to be taken down to a bald fade, or skin fade, then “blended up to a lot of length on the top; that’s what gives it the height and shape.”
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Photo: Via @durandsbarbershop/Instagram.
Pick up a medium- to strong-hold pomade and apply it when hair is halfway dry. “You want some dampness in the hair to apply and style,” he says. Then, use a comb to create your part, comb your strands into place, and add some hairspray if you want extra hold. Expect to get a close crop like this touched up every two to four weeks.
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Photo: Courtesy of Brian Hickman.
Stylist/Barber: Brian Hickman
Find Him At: Local Honey, Nashville

What To Ask For: A very layered cut that’s longer in the front

Hickman calls this cut a “surfer shag” and suggests asking for a “one-length perimeter (slightly longer in front) with lots of layers on top, in back, and around the face.” Your stylist or barber can use a straight razor or scissors, but be sure they add texture if the hair is fine.

To style it, apply a beach spray through hair, and then twist the hair to bring out the natural texture. If the result is too wild for you, simply smooth any crazy pieces with a balm once dry. Since this cut is longer, you can go between six and 10 weeks between trims.
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Photo: Courtesy of Mischelle Navar.
Stylist/Barber: Mischelle Navar
Find Her At: Andy Lecompte Salon, Los Angeles

What To Ask For: A longer length with razor-cut ends and light layers

Navar describes this cut as equal parts surfer and laid-back rocker, and notes that the most critical part of it is how the ends are treated. “You would need to ask for a razor cut on the ends, so there aren’t clean lines along the bottom,” she says. Request long layers, too.

To style it, simply run some styling cream through hair and let it dry naturally. “It's best to not over-style it,” she says. And maintenance? “One would need to cut their hair about every two to three months to maintain this look.”
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Photo: Courtesy of Dre The Barber.
Stylist/Barber: Dre the Barber
Find Him At: Plush Midtown, Atlanta

What To Ask For: A low, bald fade with a longer, curly top

“This is the most popular style amongst teenagers in Atlanta,” Dre the Barber tells us. “It’s a shadow fade with a curly, nappy top.” Expect to get it trimmed every two weeks to keep the look, and be sure to pick up “a good conditioner or moisturizer,” he adds.

When it comes to styling, Dre says that your best bet is to pick “a curling sponge to give you that look,” but most importantly, be sure you go to a good barber who can blend and fade, he says.
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Photo: Courtesy of Buddy Porter.
Stylist/Barber: Buddy Porter
Find Him At: Ramirez|Tran, Los Angeles

What To Ask For: A soft undercut with blended, long layers

“This is a transitional haircut,” Porter tells us. “My client was growing his hair out, so we took out [the] weight and refined the shape of his haircut for an easy and low-maintenance grow-out.” However, you don’t have to be on a mission for longer length to rock this look; just ask for a soft undercut with long layers, or follow Porter’s advice and bring in a photo. “A picture will speak a thousand words!” he says.

Then, to style it, Porter suggests you “rough-dry the hair back and forth until it's nice and tousled” for straight to wavy hair, or blow it out with a brush if you have curly to coarse hair, like his client in our photo. For the kind of lived-in texture you see here, Porter suggests blasting hair with Oribe's Dry Texturizing Spray, and then scrunching some of Leonor Greyl's Éclat Naturel into the hair. If you want to maintain the length, plan on getting a cut every two months.
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Photo: Courtesy of Youssef Barber.
Stylist/Barber: Youssef Barber
Find Him At: Diamond Cuts, Atlanta

What To Ask For: A temp fade with curls and texture on top

“This is a very common cut these days,” Barber tells us, describing it as a fade on the temples and back with texture and curls on the top. To style at home, Barber suggests picking up his own Curl Sponge and a natural pomade. “The Curl Sponge is used daily, just like you would use a regular brush,” he says, adding that the pomade is just as important. “[Get] something organic, that is shea- and/or coconut oil-based,” he says. “Not only does it add shine and hold, but it also promotes healthy hair and scalp.” Then, expect to be back in the chair every two weeks to “re-fade the temples and crisp the line back up.”
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Photo: Courtesy of Sal Salcedo.
Stylist/Barber: Sal Salcedo
Find Him At: Ramirez|Tran, Los Angeles

What To Ask For: A classic men's haircut that’s been texturized for a loose feel

Salcedo describes this cut as perfect for the modern gentleman, thanks to its “throwback '50s feel of the slicked-back man,” but “with a dash of modern freedom” thanks to the looser feeling of the top. Any barber can accomplish a classic gentleman’s cut, but “ask your stylist to texturize the hair throughout to acquire a loose feel,” Salcedo says.

Style by wetting the hair and blowdrying it until dry, and then use just a touch of light pomade to keep it in place. “The key is to not overuse product; let it be free." (But only until the six-week point, when he suggests you get a trim!)
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Photo: Courtesy of Brian Hickman.
Stylist/Barber: Brian Hickman
Find Him At: Local Honey, Nashville

What To Ask For: A short shag with square layers

Strategically placing the layers is what gives this cut its edge. Ask for “square layers that follow the shape of the head [while] maintaining length on the top,” Hickman tells us. “Leave the hair shaggy around the ears, but a bit cleaner around the neck and [give it] lots of texture... This could also be a great opportunity for a straight-razor cut.”

To style a similar cut at home, he suggests evenly applying Hairstory Undressed cream from roots to ends and finger-combing into place to air-dry. For extra definition, warm a little Rough Luxury Soft paste by Oribe through the dry hair. You can wait up to eight weeks to clean up this cut.
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Photo: Courtesy of Dominic Bloomfield.
Stylist/Barber: Dominic Bloomfield
Find Him At: The Nomad Barber, London

What To Ask For: A low taper that is gradually shorter around the hairline and up to three inches on top

Bloomfield calls this cut incredibly versatile and notes that it’s best suited for curly or wavy hair. “This is a perfect cut for someone who wants their hairstyle to be as low-maintenance as possible,” he says. To get the look, ask your stylist or barber for “a low taper that is gradually shorter around the hairline,” which “creates contrast through the sides.” Keep the top between two and three inches long to “allow the hair to curl and show off the shape of the layers.”

And to style it? “Scrunching is key to achieving this beachy look,” he says. “Apply a texturizing lotion or salt spray liberally through damp hair, [and] blowdry on a low setting whilst scrunching the hair back on itself, which will allow the curls to form. Once fully dry, finish with a light matte clay or hairspray to hold.” Trim every four to six weeks.
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Photo: Courtesy of Brian Hickman.
Stylist/Barber: Brian Hickman
Find Him At: Local Honey, Nashville

What To Ask For: An A-line cut with long, textured layers

Hickman describes this cut as having a one-length perimeter, “which means slightly longer in the front,” with square layers through the top and back, very subtle face-framing layers, and a fair amount of texture all over.

To get it: Towel-dry your hair and spray with R+Co's Rockaway Spray from roots to ends, then work a touch of the brand’s Mannequin Paste from mid-lengths to ends. Keep the hair off your face as it air-dries (you can diffuse it if you’re in a hurry), then add a bit more styling paste to dry hair and tousle with your hands once dry.
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Photo: Courtesy of Wes Sharpton.
Stylist/Barber: Wes Sharpton
Find Him At: Hairstory, New York City

What To Ask For: A grown-out, shaggy cut

Sharpton found inspiration in a young Keith Richards for this cut, which he says you can accomplish (most accurately) by bringing in a photo and telling your stylist or barber that you don’t want it to look too clean-cut. “You want a grown-out feeling,” he tells us. “It should be tailored to you, but not feel too done or look like it’s been freshly cut.” This, in turn, means your stylist should aim for this length, then thin and texturize as needed, based on your texture.

To style it, Sharpton suggests spraying Hairstory’s Undressed through damp hair “so that it’s saturated enough to see your natural texture come out, then use your fingers to separate and shake up gently, moving the hair in the direction in which you want it to fall.”
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Photo: Courtesy of Dominic Bloomfield.
Stylist/Barber: Dominic Bloomfield
Find Him At: The Nomad Barber, London

What To Ask For: A skin fade through the back and sides, with a curved parting line placed from the temple to below the crown

“A sharp, simple, and low-maintenance style that is perfect for just about any hair type,” is how Bloomfield describes this cut, which has added interest thanks to an artfully placed part. “The line breaks up the haircut and gives the style a fresh and edgy look,” he says. His final tip: “Ask for the top to be cut to a finger's length with scissors; this will give the hair great texture,” he says.

Then, to style it, use a matte paste or clay throughout blowdried or towel-dried hair. To keep the cut fresh, expect to get it cleaned up every three to four weeks.
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Photo: Courtesy of Brian Hickman.
Stylist/Barber: Brian Hickman
Find Him At: Local Honey, Nashville

What To Ask For: A long fade

Hickman describes this cut as a “textured crop.” It's achieved by “using a shear-over-comb technique, with a very clean perimeter, [while] leaving some length at the top and lots of texture.” To style it at home, he suggests applying Evo Box O’Bollox to damp hair before pushing it into place to dry. Expect to get it cleaned up every three to five weeks.
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Photo: Courtesy of Anh Co Tran.
Stylist/Barber: Anh Co Tran
Find Him At: Ramirez|Tran, Los Angeles

What To Ask For: Tight sides with a back fade, with disconnection on the top

Tran described this look as a “disconnected fade,” noting that it’s a great way for those with curly hair to get an edgy look that is still short and trim. Ask for tight sides and a back fade, then work a lightweight serum or leave-in conditioner through hair when it’s still damp, which “will keep the hair moist and shiny-looking,” Tran says. Easy? Yes, but you will need to come in for regular trims to keep it in shape. “I would say every three or four weeks to keep the sharpness of the fade; that's what makes the look.”
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Photo: Courtesy of Dre The Barber.
Stylist/Barber: Dre the Barber
Find Him At: Plush Midtown, Atlanta

What To Ask For: A shadow fade with a longer, curly top and a side-part

“The bottom is basically the same cut [as slide five] — the only thing that is different is I didn't [use] a low, bald fade and I gave him a part on the side,” Dre tells us, noting that this small change, along with this client’s neatly trimmed beard, created a business-friendly look that still has edge. To style it, simply heed Dre’s advice for the aforementioned cut.
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Photo: Courtesy of Wes Sharpton.
Stylist/Barber: Wes Sharpton
Find Him At: Hairstory, New York City

What To Ask For: A pushed-forward cut with choppy ends

Sharpton describes this cut as “modern mod” and instructs anyone looking to replicate it: “Tell your stylist that you’re looking to keep more length on top and that you’d like to have it pushed forward.” (A picture is necessary in most cases, but especially for a cut like this, which has purposefully erratic ends.)

Then, to style it, work two pumps of Hairstory’s Hair Balm into towel-dried hair and comb it forward. The best part? "I think the great thing about haircuts like this is that because there’s that little bit of an erratic feeling in the front, you can stretch it a little further in-between cuts,” Sharpton says. “It will evolve, of course, but can continue to be interesting. I’d recommend going back in for a cut at around three months.”
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Photo: Courtesy of J. Clark Walker.
Stylist/Barber: J. Clark Walker
Find Him At: Fellow Barber, New York City

What To Ask For: A disconnected pompadour

“I would describe this cut as a 'disconnected pompadour,'” Walker tells us. “[A] ‘pompadour’ these days just means big and combed back, and ‘disconnected’ just because there isn't really an attempt to blend the sides and the top.” And while it may look like an undercut, Walker notes that this doesn’t fully describe the style, so nix that from your vocabulary if this is what you’re after. Instead, ask for the bottom “no shorter than a 2” with a slight fade, but with the top kept longer. The top can be thinned out if the hair is thick, but the real key is to bring in a picture.
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Photo Via: @cabolii/Instagram.
Style it using this strategy: Towel-dry, then blowdry with a brush in whatever direction you want the hair to go. Once it's completely dry, apply a matte paste or wax with your hands before combing it into place. “The best part about this haircut is that it probably looks as good a couple weeks after the cut as it did when you walked out of the barber shop,” he says. “[Which] allows you to wear the style for four to six weeks.”
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Photo: Courtesy of
Stylist/Barber: Brian Hickman
Find Him At: Local Honey, Nashville

What To Ask For: A classic undercut

Hickman describes this cut as a "classic undercut" and suggests steering your stylist along this path: "Start by cutting the sides square, following the head shape, at a finger-length depth," he explains. Then connect the entire side to the top by cutting it behind the ears, by over-directing the hair in the front to behind the ears to keep more length up front.
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Photo Via: @mattbenson91/Instagram.
This cut should also be textured, depending on the density of the hair. To style it, "add R+Co Motorcycle Gel to towel-dried hair from roots to ends" to define natural movement and shape. Either air-dry or use a diffuser, then, once dry, "move and shape hair into place using a light pomade, like Oribe's Fiber Groom."You'll need a trim every four to six weeks to keep it in shape.
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Photo: Via @mattyconrad/Instagram.
Stylist/Barber: Matty Conrad
Find Him At: Matty Conrad / Victory Barber & Brand

What To Ask For: A textured cut with a lot of length on top — paired with a faded clipper cut. Conrad's cuts are almost always recognizable, considering his emphasis on taking a classic men's style and making it fresh and new — without focusing on trends.
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Photo: Via @eddiefinestcutz
Stylist/Barber: Eddie Rivera

Find Him At: Eddie's Finest Cutz, Clermont, Florida

What To Ask For: A skin taper with a blended beard. Rivera accomplished this precise look with a straight razor and shave gel, thinning his client's hair shorter towards the neck.
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Photo: Via @khiydreadsncutz.
Stylist/Barber: Khiy The Super Fader

Find Him At: Legacy Kutz Barbershop, Snellville, Georgia

What To Ask For: A drop fade with a part. This way, you can show off a cool design without losing your length up top.
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