Sweden-meets-SoHo with the arrival of the Acne Studio. By Christene Barberich
johnnyacneWell before Sweden became fashion's birthplace of over-dyed skinny jeans, it was the home of Acne, a multi-faceted design company that infused the hallmark of Scandinavian aesthetics into a truly modern trend-free collection. Today, Stockholm's finest is bringing its singular vision of subdued utilitarian idealism to a light-filled shop on Greene Street—the label's first "studio" in the States.
Advertisement
Behind the iconic Tube jeans, discreet suiting, the lush Acne Paper, and, now, the shop's "Gustavian-inspired" interior, is the brand's creative director, Jonny Johannsson. With Acne architect Andreas Fornell (and with the aid of Opening Ceremony), Johannsson extended his penchant for unfinished work-room style details into a quaint space accented with original Acne-fashioned furnishings, a cluster of potted tulips, and clever hidden door panels concealing the back-room office and fitting areas.
Johannsson, in town for the opening, took us on a tour of his new Stockholm-meets-SoHo "studio."
How long has this store been in the works?
Forever, I think. It's more or less one of the first or second things that you think of [as a designer].
When you imagined the "perfect New York store," what came to mind?
For me personally, it has a lot to do with having a really great relationship with Opening Ceremony, that's why it's here in this space right now. And also, I've always been drawn to this area of New York. When I used to come here when I was young, I'd always go to Canal Street to pick up ugly things!
Advertisement
Is this shop similar to your others?
Every store is different. They're all kind of individual, but they're also united by this feeling of being unfinished, a little bit of a work in progress, portraying an art-photo studio kind of feel. But for all our stores, our colors are light and powdery, and Andreas and I do the furniture design together. Our brand is a platform for doing lots of different things.
Any chance you'll eventually be selling your own furnishings and objects in the shop?
Yes, it's a great possibility.
Can you point out a few details you're particularly pleased with?
These knobs [on the wall], are based on typical Swedish doorknobs, oversized on purpose and made by a well-known Swedish glass designer who is also a friend of mine, Ingere Rädmam. When we sit down and have coffee, she's always saying things like, 'Jonny why do you always decorate the front of the woman and not the back?' She's just a really interesting person, and to me that's inspiring.
Advertisement
Acne Studio, 10 Greene Street, New York City; 212-625-2828.
Photography by Piera Gelardi
Sweden-meets-SoHo with the arrival of the Acne Studio.
Advertisement

More from Stores

The term "lady" certainly feels pretty antiquated. But in H&M's latest campaign commercial, the dated word gets a cool, thoroughly modern ...
J.Crew doesn't have the over-the-top quality of some other shows (or, as fashion critic Vanessa Friedman recently called them, "hashtag hoo-has") such as ...
Here’s a sentence my teenage self never thought she’d write: Lane Bryant is seriously killing the plus game. Besides an overall aesthetic shift from “stuff...
Lane Bryant's latest campaign is evidently not suitable for national network TV audiences: Its 30-second spot was banned by ABC and NBC. Featuring plus-...
If you had any lingering doubt that fashion is all about nostalgia, just take a look at Opening Ceremony's new arrivals: Humberto Leon and Carol Lim keep ...
We should probably employ a "believe it or not" clause around all of the epic tales we heard while on our exclusive tour of Cartier's newly renovated ...
When I saw Ashley Nell Tipton on Project Runway, I knew that a sea change had just occurred. It was thrilling to watch her tackle challenge after challenge...
After last month's productive spring-cleaning binge, we imagine your closet's looking a little sparse these days. With all of that freed-up space, the ...
H&M is on a quest for ambitious, innovative green ideas that could change the fashion biz. The Swedish retailer's non-profit arm, H&M Foundation...
Another day, another independent artist calling out fast fashion for ripping off work. Let's get right to it: Azerbaijani artist Faig Ahmed, who is known ...
If you've been a fan of R29's for years, you'll know we have a soft spot in our hearts for J.Crew. Its new arrivals always seem to address exactly what our...
A new book, set to be released in Sweden next week, asserts that the factories in Myanmar under contract with H&M hired employees as young as 14 and ...
Update: H&M just released a second look at its upcoming collaboration with Kenzo — one that teases a very different direction for a fast-fashion ...
Just a few weeks after people rallied behind artist Tuesday Bassen following allegations that Zara copied her original illustrations on numerous ...