This Weird Factual Quiz Predicts If You'll Vote Trump

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The 2016 Presidential campaign has thrown the divide in America into sharp relief. Clinton backers can't believe anyone would support Trump. Many Trump backers believe, as does their candidate, that Clinton rightly belongs behind bars.

But there may be a single predictor that tells us where a person's support will lie. William Poundstone, writing for the Daily Beast, conducted a series of quizzes alongside a poll about the election. He presented the following questions as multiple choice answers. You probably won't need the help.

1. Where does bacon come from?

2. What sport is played in Dodger Stadium?

3. True or false: Dinosaurs such as Tyrannosaurus lived at the same time as early humans.

The answers are pigs, baseball, and false. Congratulations. If you got 100%, you are among the 67% that score that high. Around 25% missed one, and a few people missed all three. Here's what Poundstone observed:

"I found a strong correlation between scoring poorly on this quiz and support for Trump as president," he writes. "On average, those who rated Trump favorably or neutral got 2.36 questions right. Those who rated Trump unfavorably averaged 2.65 questions right. This difference was statistically significant to a compelling degree."

We should include caveats with his findings. The Daily Beast is not a peer-reviewed scientific publication. His sample size is small, but not vanishingly so. We don't have a full grasp of what he means when he says he corrects for education level, we don't know how the quiz might have been affected by the way they were positioned within the survey, and we don't know how if implicit bias was passed on by the survey takers. Not to say that Poundstone doesn't have ready answers for these questions, they're just not conveyed here.

Still, a fascinating quiz that provides evidence that a person's choice for President might be informed by a low level of information about the world around them. Shocking, we know.

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