These 25 Jobs Have The Best Work-Life Balance

Photo: Maia Harms.
The dream: A job you love, that also allows you to have plenty of time to spend with your friends and family. That’s not always easy to find, especially in today’s hyper-connected work force, where many employees walk a tightrope between their professional and personal lives. Unless you’re a data scientist, of course.

Data scientist tops Glassdoor's new list of 25 jobs with the best work-life balance. The gig offers a base salary of $144,808 and received a work-life balance rating of 4.2 (out of 5). If that sounds awesome, there are also 1,315 openings for the title in Glassdoor's job listings.

Also appearing in the top 10: SEO manager comes in second, social media manager nabs the fourth spot, and web developer rounds out the list. While the full ranking has a few surprises (hello, substitute teacher!), it heavily features careers in the tech industry (10 tech jobs, in fact), including UX designer and front-end developer. Each job is accompanied by a work-balance rating, the number of job openings in each field, and the average base salary.

Glassdoor’s list is based entirely on employee feedback shared over the past year. To be considered, a job title must have at least 75 work-life balance ratings shared from a minimum of 75 companies. It must also include the phrase “work-life balance” as a pro in at least 15% of reviews submitted to the site.
"Many employees are now connected to their work 24/7 thanks to technology, often checking their email and putting in extra hours on nights, weekends, and even when they’re out on vacation in many cases," Glassdoor's career trend analyst, Scott Dobroski, told Fast Company.

That may be the main reason why employees report less satisfaction with their work-life balance. According to 60,000 Glassdoor reviews, employees reported an average work-life balance of 3.5 in 2009, which fell to 3.2 in 2013.

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to read the full list of careers that could lead you to a more satisfying life in and out of the office.

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