18 Striking Photos Of The Physical Test Only Two Women Have Ever Passed

On Friday, Capt. Kristen Griest and 1st Lt. Shaye Haver will become the first women to graduate from the U.S. Army's physically and mentally demanding Army Ranger School. The grueling course started in April with 400 soldiers — 381 men and 19 women — and after months of little food and sleep, as well as workouts and tests in different terrains, Griest, Haver, and 94 men made the cut.

Although Griest, a military police officer, and Haver, an Apache helicopter pilot, can't apply to be Rangers yet — women are still not allowed to serve in around 25% of Army jobs — they accomplished something few people could imagine ever trying. The U.S. Armed Forces is in the process of opening up all combat jobs to female military personnel, which means it may not be long before women will find their way into elite units such as the Rangers. All branches of the military have until January 1 to ask for exceptions to the Pentagon's integration ruling. The fact that Griest and Haver made it through the program will help the case for gender equality.

What is it actually like to go through such an intense training program? These photos, originally published by Military.com, offer a glimpse of what it actually looks like to train for this unit. It's a lot of dirt, a lot of discomfort, and a lot of determination.
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Photo: Courtesy of Spc. Nikayla Shodeen/ U.S. Army Photos/ Miltary.com.
According to an army press release sent to R29, the three part program includes, "49 push-ups, 59 sit-ups, a 5-mile run in 40 minutes, and six chin-ups; a swim test; a land navigation test; a 12-mile foot march in three hours; several obstacle courses; four days of military mountaineering; three parachute jumps; four air assaults on helicopters; multiple rubber boat movements; and 27 days of mock combat patrols."
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Photo: Courtesy of Spc. Nikayla Shodeen/ U.S. Army Photos/ Miltary.com.
20 women qualified for Ranger School this time, and 19 started, but only 8 made it through the first phase.
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Photo: Courtesy of Spc. Nikayla Shodeen/ U.S. Army Photos/ Miltary.com.
If soldiers struggle during one part of the course, they can opt to "recycle" through it. If they pass, they can move to the next phase.
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Photo: Courtesy of Spc. Nikayla Shodeen/ U.S. Army Photos/ Miltary.com.
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Photo: Courtesy of Spc. Nikayla Shodeen/ U.S. Army Photos/ Miltary.com.
First Lt. Shaye Haver is an Apache helicopter pilot, and First Lt. Kristen Griest has served as a military police officer.
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Photo: Courtesy of Sgt. Paul Sale/U.S. Army Photos/ Miltary.com.
11 soldiers are still in training, including one more woman.
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Photo: Courtesy of Sgt. Paul Sale/U.S. Army Photos/ Miltary.com.
The same week Haver and Griest are set to graduate from Ranger School, the Navy announced it plans to open up its Navy SEAL program to women who can pass the training program.
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Photo: Courtesy of Sgt. Paul Sale/U.S. Army Photos/ Miltary.com.
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Photo: Courtesy of Sgt. Paul Sale/U.S. Army Photos/ Miltary.com.
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Photo: Courtesy of Pfc. Antonio Lewis/ U.S. Army Photos/ Miltary.com.
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Photo: Courtesy of Pfc. Antonio Lewis/ U.S. Army Photos/ Miltary.com.
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Photo: Courtesy of Pfc. Antonio Lewis/ U.S. Army Photos/ Miltary.com.
Haver and Griest both graduated from West Point.
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Photo: Courtesy of Pfc. Antonio Lewis/ U.S. Army Photos/ Miltary.com.
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Photo: Courtesy of Pfc. Antonio Lewis/ U.S. Army Photos/ Miltary.com.
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Photo: Courtesy of Spc. Dacotah Lane/ / U.S. Army Photos/ Miltary.com.
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Photo: Courtesy of Spc. Dacotah Lane/ / U.S. Army Photos/ Miltary.com.
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Photo: Courtesy of Spc. Dacotah Lane/ / U.S. Army Photos/ Miltary.com.
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