Everything You Need To Know About Twitter’s IPO

comments

mainPhoto: Via Facebook/Twitter
After Twitter initially revealed its plans to go public, we’ve been in an anxious biting-our-nails sort of state, waiting for the details to emerge and what it will all mean for the S.F.-based mico-blogging site. And, now, all the pieces are coming together with the filing’s report finally out on the surface, and let’s just say we’re going to need more than 140 characters to dish out the deets. From its future sustainability as a company to statistics on ad revenues, we’ve outlined the need-to-know facts right here.

Show them the money!
The burning question on everyone’s mind is how much Twitter is looking to garner from going public. In an almost Dr. Evil-like fashion, Twitter wants $1 billion dollars, which would bring an influx of more wealthy techies living it big in San Francisco. #renterproblems.

Let’s do a headcount
How many folks can we expect to become millionaires overnight? Twitter reports it has 2,000 workers on staff — and 900 were hired in the last year alone, which is a 90% increase from last June.

Phone it in
According to Twitter statistics, 75% of tweeters are accessing the app via their mobile devices, and ads are mostly targeted to those users on smart phones.

Raising the dough
Let’s get to the really juicy stuff, shall we? Twitter’s revenue might just make your eyebrows touch your hairline. This year alone, it has seen a profit of $253.6 million. And, if that number gets you itching to buy stock, note its losses are just as high. Overall, the company has lost $418.6 million since its initial establishment.

Stock Up
When the stock becomes available — supposedly sometime next month (possibly later) — the company will be selling 472,613,753 shares of stock for the public to have a stake in the company.

The Future
How much longer can we expect to keep tweeting? According to Twitter, that lies in the power of its users, most notably those with a blue check mark avatar next to their name. If celebrities move on to the next big thing, Twitter expects to be buried in a virtual grave.