The Top 5 Spring Hair Trends To Take L.A.

Photo: Courtesy of Margaux Brooke.
Spring is the perfect time for transformation. We'll spare you the caterpillar-to-butterfly analogy, although there is something to be said for casting off your old look (or 'do) and trying something new as the season changes. Given L.A.'s lack of seasons, it's no surprise the city got a head start.
In fact, over the past few months, more and more of L.A.'s top stylists and raddest locals have been trading in their sun-kissed lobs for a few fresh, new styles. Translation: Spring trends have officially arrived.
First, let's talk about the top two cuts. Bangs are encroaching upon lob-status popularity, but the best part is that they come in all lengths and styles, making them just as easy to wear. (Think: every version imaginable, from baby bangs to cheekbone-grazing fringe to curly face-framers.) Short, choppy cuts (both shag and bob versions) are also en vogue, but heed the advice ahead to ensure you come out with something modern that works for your texture.
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And color? Icy-blond tones, ranging from a platinum bleach-and-tone to cool, nearly white babylights, are taking hold, while shades of red are being updated with copper highlights and deep, one-color tones. Fret not if you aren't ready for commitment, because a softer version of babylights is also popping up, and it's everything you want: universally flattering and super-easy to grow out.
Alright, let's get into it. The top five L.A. hair trends to consider for spring, plus all the tips and tricks to get them at your local salon, ahead.
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Photo: Courtesy of Liz Sustaita.
Bangs

Stylist:
Liz Sustaita
Salon: Ramirez|Tran

What To Ask For: A classic bob with long layers and bangs

Sustaita knows what hair trends are coming next. Take one peek at her Instagram and it's clear she has something big on the brain: bangs. For this look, she married a bob with long layers with blunt, medium-weight bangs, which she calls a "futuristic silhouette with contemporary texture."

Luckily, this is a cut that any stylist should be able to pull off; just be sure the layers are kept long and tailored to your texture, or you'll end up with a shag. Heed Sustaita's advice for styling: Curl, define, or flatten (depending on your texture) random pieces with a 1.25-inch iron to create a bend-y look, but avoid the ends, then flip your head over and spray with texture spray suited for your hair type. To finish, flip your head back over and "piece it back down to a more sensible shape."

Upkeep:
Plan for a cut every two to three months, Sustaita says, and trim the bangs whenever they need it.
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Photo: Courtesy of Shai Amiel.
Bangs

Stylist:
Shai Amiel
Salon: Capella Salon

What To Ask For:
A square shag with short bangs

Another option that taps into two of L.A.'s biggest trends — a shaggy bob and bangs. Amiel describes this cut as a curly shag and notes that the shorter layers are the key to getting a voluminous look. "We added extra short pieces on the crown to maximize volume and the feel of randomness," he tells us, then added in short bangs for "added drama."

To style the look, he suggests drying hair upside-down and angled forward, which will promote body and keep the bangs and shorter pieces going in a forward direction. "Once dry, use fingers to separate random curls and stretch out a few pieces," he says. (Obviously, if you have straight or wavy hair you'll get a different result, although drying upside-down will add volume to any texture.)

Upkeep: Amiel believes that all curly hair should be cut every 100 days to maintain the health of the ends, and this cut is no exception.
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Photo: Courtesy of Margaux Brooke.
Bangs

Stylist:
Anh Co Tran
Salon: Ramirez|Tran

What To Ask For:
Baby bangs and an A-line lob

To be totally transparent, we did not see the baby-bangs trend being resurrected, but it's versions like this that are so undeniably fresh and cool you can see why it's taking off in a big way in L.A. Tran — who proves again and again that he's one of the most influential stylists in L.A. — is the man behind this cut, which you can get by asking for baby bangs and his signature soft lob.

Upkeep: Trim the bangs every few weeks if you want to keep the length, or let them (beautifully) grow through every bang type and only trim them with the rest of your hair (about every three months).
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Photo: Courtesy of Maria Margarita.
Bangs

Stylist:
Mateo Lara
Salon: Hairroin Salon

What To Ask For: A long, textured cut with side-swept bangs

"I would describe this look as a foxy, long, layered texture haircut with a sassy fringe," Lara says. It's also one of the easiest ways to dip your toes into the bangs trend, as this version is light and long enough to push to the side. However, Lara makes a good point when he instructs anyone who wants this cut to bring in a photo, or the bangs you ask for might not be the ones you get. "Having a photo to reference is my ideal way of knowing exactly what my client is asking for," he says.

This cut can be easily styled a variety of ways, but the tricky part are the bangs. "Blowdry your fringe in every direction, besides up, of course, and you neutralize the root," Lara tells us. "Then finish it off with a texture spray at the roots only to add body and separation."

Upkeep: You should trim the bangs monthly.
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Photo: Courtesy of Sal Salcedo.
The Choppy Bob

Stylist: Sal Salcedo
Salon: Ramirez|Tran

What To Ask For:
Soft fringe and an A-line shag that hits your collarbone

Does going shoulder-length leave you feeling uneasy? You can cheat this trend a bit and go a tad longer. Salcedo has become a breakout star in the L.A. hair world thanks to modern cuts like this. He calls this an "angled, modern shag." To get the look, be sure to ask for an A-line shape (longer in the front than back), to keep the shag cut modern; and textured layers and soft bangs, to keep it looking cool, but don't get crazy with layers. "Less is more," he says. "You can always add more texture if you wish to, but start with a little."

Wrap-dry the bangs (push left against the scalp and dry a little, then pull right and dry a little more; repeat), and create waves or define your natural texture with an iron on the rest.

Upkeep:
"The grow-out on this haircut is very natural; you shouldn't have to see your stylist unless you want to keep the length," Salcedo says, but notes that you should trim the fringe monthly.
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Photo: Courtesy of Shai Amiel.
The Choppy Bob

Stylist:
Shai Amiel
Salon: Capella Salon

What To Ask For:
Rounded layers with side-swept bangs

"Nathalie loves her big, round-curly look," Amiel says. "She plays a slave on Game of Thrones, so we had to maintain her look [so it was] consistent [for filming]." Her character's continuity is inspiration to our ears; to get a similar style, ask for a round shape that hits the jawline when dry and has light layering. "There are lots of random bits all over to give her volume and movement," Amiel says. To style the cut, Amiel suggests you "shake hair as hard as possible to create movement before you dry it," then stretch out the dry curls to create even more bounce.

Upkeep: A trim every 100 days will keep curls bouncy and healthy, Amiel says.
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Photo: Courtesy of Buddy Porter.
The Choppy Bob

Stylist:
Buddy Porter
Salon: Ramirez|Tran

What To Ask For: A classic bob with softly cut layers

Porter gave actress Sophia Bush this chop, which he calls a textured bob. "[It] maintains the classic bob shape, but is point-cut and softly layered," he tells us. This gives the look built-in body. To score the loose, tousled waves he created here, start with straight to wavy hair, whether achieved naturally or by heat-styling. Use a 1.25-inch iron to create or define bends in alternating directions, spray a texture or dry-shampoo spray through hair from roots to mid-shaft (Porter recommends L'Oréal Professionel's Next Day Hair), smooth ends with a styling cream (Porter used Leonor Greyl's Éclat Naturel), and finger-comb into place.

Upkeep: Trimming every two months is best, Porter says.
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Photo: Courtesy of Colleen Duffy.
The Choppy Bob

Stylist:
Colleen Duffy
Salon: Sally Hershberger

What To Ask For: A slight A-line with light layering and texturized ends

Choppy need not mean shaggy; simply follow Duffy's direction and keep the layers long, but still textured. Which, as she describes, results in a look that's "edgy, but still polished." To get the look, ask for "very minimal layering, slightly longer in the front, and texturizing only on the ends with thinning shears or [a] razor," she tells us.

To style it similarly to what you see here, Duffy suggests blowdrying the hair straight with a round brush, directing the nozzle away from the face, then defining the ends with pomade (Duffy recommends Sally Hershberger 24K) to "piece out the cut and show texture."

Upkeep:
The cut will grow out nicely, but trims every two to three months will keep the shape.
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Photo: Courtesy of Anh Co Tran.
The Choppy Bob

Stylist:
Anh Co Tran
Salon: Ramirez|Tran

What To Ask For:
An A-line bob with texture

While the words "short and choppy" would seem like all you need to reference when scoring this cut at your own salon, there's more to this 'do than meets the eye. Tran suggests asking for a classic bob with an A-line (about an inch shorter in back is ideal), with textured layers throughout. Just be sure your stylist takes into account the weight and texture of your hair when adding the layers. (Too few on thick or curly hair and you'll get a mushroom shape; too many on fine hair and you'll get a short shag.)

Upkeep: "The cut should generally last you eight to 10 weeks," Tran says, "depending on how quick your hair grows."
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Photo: Courtesy of Aura Friedman.
Icy Blond

Stylist:
Aura Friedman
Salon: Sally Hershberger

What To Ask For: Platinum with a Champagne-pink tone

"The process is the same as you would use for a platinum hair color, so it's a bleach-and-tone," Friedman says. Two steps? Technically, yes, but don't take this process lightly: Friedman bleaches strategically (roots last) to avoid damage, and reminds everyone that they should always go in for a consultation first. "A bleach-and-tone is so damaging that you should always go in for a consultation to see if your hair can handle it," she tells us. Then, never jump around from colorist to colorist for root touch-ups (that's when damage happens, since they're not communicating about what they're using and where), and always "treat your hair like a princess" (it's going to be fragile!).

Keep the tone in check by coming in for a color gloss every few weeks and using a purple conditioner (Friedman recommends Davines Silver Conditioner).

Upkeep: Every four to six weeks — or your roots will be harder to color, since bleach lightens quicker at the root (due to body heat) and will leave you with a line between the original bleach job and the roots. Translation: You have to be vigilant.
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Photo: Courtesy of Cassondra Kaeding.
Icy Blond

Stylist:
Cassondra Kaeding
Salon: Sally Hershberger

What To Ask For:
Ashy-blond platinum

"I call this color an icy-blond," Kaeding tells us. It requires a trick known by all the best colorists. "To get your hair icy-blond, add in ashy and silver tones, staying on the cooler side," she says. A photo is important if you want to score this look, and Kaeding notes that you should stress the word "ashy" — otherwise, you may end up with a light golden-blond or Champagne color.

To care for this hue at home (not easy, mind you), regularly apply a hair oil or natural oil (like coconut) to freshly washed hair and let it soak in overnight, Kaeding says. "Additionally, avoid tight hair ties because they can cause breakage," and "invest in a silk pillowcase because it is much more gentle on your hair."

Upkeep:
Every four to six weeks for your roots, but Kaeding also notes: "With ashy tones, you also have the option of coming back in two weeks after your color for a five-minute color gloss to freshen up your hair."
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Photo: Via @karihillhair.
Icy Blond

Stylist:
Kari Hill
Salon: Mèche

What To Ask For: A very heavy, cool-toned set of foiled highlights

Want to sport bangs and an icy blonde hue? To keep it looking polished (that is, sans heavy roots) you can opt for a full bleach and tone or heed Hill's advice for a more commitment-friendly look. "If you are going to have bangs with this icy blonde look, highlights applied all the way to the root are a necessity," she explains. "A client should ask for this traditional application that can provide a more detailed and strategic individualized look."

Bring in a picture and ask for a heavy set of baby lights in the coolest tone possible, applied all the way to the roots. If your hair is naturally light, this is all you need, but those with darker locks can opt for a lighter base first. Either way, this strategy provides more depth than a bleach and tone and allows for longer between visits.

Hill calls this look "rocker blonde" and notes that a weekly routine involving a lavender product is key to keep it looking icy. "L'Oreal Paris Everpure Brass Banisher Shampoo, Conditioner, and Treatment are amazing to keep this blonde tone cool from the roots to the ends," she says. (Hill is a spokesperson for the brand.)

Upkeep: Every six to eight weeks.
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Photo: Courtesy of Deborah Anderson.
Icy Blond

Stylist:
Marcia Hamilton
Salon: Hamilton Hair

What To Ask For: Platinum color with shadowed roots

Hamilton actually first created this look on herself. She describes it as "platinum-blond with a dark gray-brown root." The roots, which can be done with toner or color, are key to creating a low-maintenance look. "When you ask for this look, describe it as platinum-blond with a shadowed root," she says. "This will let the colorist know you would like a soft and slightly outgrown root look."

To keep it looking fresh at home, Hamilton uses Clairol Shimmering Lights Shampoo and Conditioner. Tip: Start with just the conditioner as needed for brassiness, as the shampoo can be tricky to use since it's deeply pigmented.

Upkeep: Every six to eight weeks.
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Photo: Courtesy of Liz Jung.
Icy Blond

Stylist:
Liz Jung
Salon: Mèche Salon

What To Ask For: Pale babylights

Jung calls the look she created here "buttercream babylights." (That is, baby-fine, foiled highlights in an icy shade just richer than platinum.) For those who want the exact look: She used Redken Flash Lift to lift the hair and Shades EQ in Irish Cream to tone it to the right shade. It's also an on-trend combination for those who want to keep a bit of dimension — or avoid a full-on bleach-and-tone — although the process may need a base color first for those with naturally dark locks.

Upkeep: You'll need to get this color touched up every two to three months, Jung says, and use a shampoo formulated for blondes (she recommends Redken Blonde Idol) and a rich conditioner to maintain the color and health of the hair.
15 of 19
Photo: Courtesy of Buddy Porter.
Shades Of Red

Stylist: Buddy Porter (cut) and KC Carhart (color)
Salon: Ramirez|Tran

What To Ask For: A long and layered cut with bangs that graze the eyebrows; highlights and a copper or red gloss

For those who feel that two (trends) is better than one. Porter describes this as "a long, layered, shaggy cut with long, messy bangs" and notes it's great for anyone who wants to wash and go; just be sure you ask for long layers that suit your texture. He suggests rough-drying to bring out your texture and keeping a can of Oribe Apres Beach on hand, which will add definition and a bit of shine to any hair type.

Carhart describes this color as "a very bold copper-red with dimension," which she achieved by adding a copper color glaze over subtle highlights. (If your hair already has dimension, you can opt for a glaze, she says, but if your hair is dark it must be bleached down first.) Opt for a color-depositing mask to keep it fresh (red fades fast): Carhart recommends Davines Alchemic Conditioner in Copper. "It will keep your color from fading too much between appointments," she says.

Upkeep: "This haircut will last you up to four months if cut properly, and maintaining the bangs will require quick bang trims every four to five weeks," Porter says. The color will need a gloss every two months.
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Photo: Courtesy of Chris Greene.
Shades Of Red

Stylist:
Chris Greene
Salon: Mèche Salon

What To Ask For: A rich, all-over mahogany color

"This all-over color is a mix of burgundy and copper," Greene tells us, noting that a little dimension is required, or you may get a result that looks flat. If your hair already has lighter pieces, you're all set — or have your colorist add some highlights first. Since red fades fast, use a shampoo and conditioner for color-treated hair, but "try not to wash your hair too often, and when you do, avoid hot water," Greene says.

Upkeep:
Plan on getting a gloss to refresh the color every four to six weeks, Greene says.
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Photo: Courtesy of Chris Greene.
Barely There Babylights

Stylist:
Chris Greene
Salon: Mèche Salon

What To Ask For: A medium-brown base with dark-blond babylights

Highlighted hair will always be all the rage in Los Angeles, if not worldwide, but soft versions that mimic grown-out color are gaining more traction among chic locals. Greene describes this color as "soft, sexy, and sun-kissed," which he achieved with a medium-brown all-over base and baby-fine, dark-blond highlights.

"This look is all about the blended highlights and subtle contrast," he says. "The highlights are throughout the whole head and concentrated more around her face and the tips of her layers. The roots of the highlights are then blended with a similar color to the base, so the highlights don’t look too obvious."

Upkeep:
The babylights don't need to be done every visit, Greene says, so your visits will be dictated by how you feel about your roots. (Six weeks if you want to cover them; up to six months to refresh the entire look.)
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Photo: Courtesy of Johnny Ramirez.
Barely There Babylights

Stylist: Johnny Ramirez
Salon: Ramirez|Tran

What To Ask For: Sun-kissed, golden copper

Ramirez says this is his signature lived-in color, but in red, calling it a "little bit sun-kissed, with gold copper." His oft-copied process is based around lightening the ends, weaving in dimension, and then toning the roots to a shade that will grow out without a line of demarcation. Even so, red is a tricky hue to maintain, so he suggests using a color-safe shampoo. (He likes L'Oréal's Vitamino, as it "helps to retain color and is fade-resistant.") He also notes that "red is extremely hard to remove, so make sure you are committed."

Upkeep: Ramirez's signature method lasts six months, with one exception. "Red is very high-maintenance," he says. "You may want to come in for highlights to bump up the color every two to three months, depending on if you see fading."
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Photo: Courtesy of
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