We Tested Amazon's Most Popular Spiralizers & Here's Which One Worked Best

Zoodles, aside from being a popular noodle alternative, can be a pain in the ass to make. Unless of course, you're equipped with a reliable spiralizer. Maybe you already own one of these magical kitchen gadgets. Or, maybe you're thinking, "spiral-what?" Vegetable spiralizers are the contraptions that make all of our produce-pasta dreams a faster meal reality. There are a range of prices and sizes available and some are easier to use than others. So, figuring out which one to purchase can be confusing AF.
In order to sort out the strong spiralizers from the weak, we decided to consult the online mecca of consumer product reviews: Amazon. After selecting two of the site's highest rated options, we tested them out ourselves. Was it the cheaper compact handheld or the slightly pricier premium model that really got the spiralizing job done right? Scroll on to find out.
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Photo: Courtesy of Elizabeth Buxton.

The Premium Spiralizer



This product was one of Amazon's top ranked in terms of premium models, scoring a 4.5 out of the typical 5 star rating. The spike crank handle, three interchangeable stainless steel blades, and counter suction capabilities all seemed to point to spiralizing success.

Lifestyle Dynamics SpiraLife Pro Vegetable Spiralizer, $19.99, available at Amazon.
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Photo: Courtesy of Elizabeth Buxton.

Premium Results



Setup
Very straightforward. The premium spiralizer came ready to use straight from the box — and was fairly self-explanatory, without needing to consult the recommended instruction video. The suction base securely locked the contraption to the countertop, and the crank handle with spiked end fixed the zucchini in place for swift spiralizing (no slippage or stopping).

Blades
The three interchangeable blades fit compactly into the overall design of the premium model (with one locked into place for spiralizing and the other two stored in easy-to-access base slots). Once spiralizing began, they proved to be sharp and durable.

Zoodles
The three zoodle options (pictured right) were a standard long and spaghetti-like shape, a short and more separated spirlized shape, and a disc-like spiral shape. Once the contraption got started, the resulting zoodles took no time to spiralize and looked pretty professional.

Cleanup
Surprisingly easy! Although the premium model is much larger than smaller handheld options, cleanup was still streamlined: the parts were easy to separate, rinse off in the sink, and store away in a cabinet. Plus, the removable and interchangeable blades made removing any stuck zucchini remnants a cinch.
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Photo: Courtesy of Elizabeth Buxton.

The Handheld Spiralizer



Handheld spiralizers are certainly small and affordable — but are they as fast and easy to use as the larger, more premium options? We tested out this high-ranking handheld product (another 4.5 out of 5) with dual blades in order to find out.

Lifestyle Dynamics Original SpiraLife Vegetable Spiralizer, $14.97, available at Amazon.
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Photo: Courtesy of Elizabeth Buxton.

Handheld Results



Setup
Although equally as straightforward as the premium model, the handheld didn't feel as sturdy. Without a suction cup base to lock the contraption into place, slicing the zucchini noodles with just our hands was a slippery mess.

Blades
The two built-in blade options on either end of the handheld offered the standard spaghetti-like zoodle shapes and, what we can only assume was supposed to be, the spiralized disc shapes (pictured right). The blades did not feel as strong or sharp as the premium models and the results were choppy..

Zoodles
Both zoodle results were inconsistent — the spiralized discs ended up looking more like shavings and the spaghetti-like shapes like we had used a vegetable peeler. The effort outweighed not only the quality, but also the amount that we were able to produce before our hands ultimately cramped up.

Cleanup
Shockingly this little contraption did not rinse off in the sink as seamlessly as the larger premium model had: the blades were not removable, bits of the zucchini became lodged inside, and not even a caterpillar cleaning brush could help us wedge them out. (Ended up having to let it soak in a tub of hot soapy water overnight.)
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The Winner



The larger, and slightly more expensive, model ultimately beat out the handheld option. Although we appreciated the compact size of the handheld for our tinier kitchen spaces, it was too troublesome to use when attempting to make an entire meal's worth of zoodles. Bigger-batch zucchini noodles are most easily served with the crank handle model: it's secure, swift, and surprisingly easier to clean, and even store. We'll be saving the handheld for smaller garnishing situations. Happy zoodling!
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