5 Reasons NOT To Shop

Illustrated by Sydney Hass.
We know all the moves to the happy-shopping dance. They're not the same for everyone, but the essential choreography is the uncontrollable shake, twist, and jump that lets everyone know that we just scored something good. But, while we're big fans of the HSD around R29, it's just as important to recognize when a bit of “retail therapy” isn't feel-good or dance-inducing, but rather a lame attempt to face down boredom, anxiety, or the blues.
Emotional shopping may not always be our downfall — sometimes we're truly looking for a specific find — but understanding our actions can help us nip this bad behavior in the bud before it becomes habit.
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In an effort to understand the cause of our retail compulsions, and tackle the best reasons to back away from the cash register, we turned to a few informed experts. With their help, we can change our reactions to the first signs of impulsive shopping, so we're not left with an empty bank account or a too-full closet. Ahead, learn when to say no, and how put the power back into your glee-filled, post-sale shimmy. Now that’s therapeutic.
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Illustrated by Sydney Hass.
The Bored Buy
It's a slow Sunday night (okay, fine, Friday night), you're suffering Netflix indecision, and your usual going-out group is nowhere to be found. So, you fall into a friendly little Internet black hole of e-commerce sites, constantly pressing "add to cart," and before you know it, you've placed so many orders you've basically waved goodbye to this week's paycheck.

As psychotherapist Peggy Wynne points out, the advent of online shopping — though not necessarily recent — is a huge part of why we shop when we're bored. With the accessibility at our fingertips, "we get too much sensory overload and are triggered instantly," she explains. "It's sort of like online gambling or porn." You don't need to go anywhere and barely need to do anything to make a purchase — the satisfaction is instant, though not necessarily a cure.
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Illustrated by Sydney Hass.
The Solution: Dig Deeper
The best trick for conquering bored-buyer burnout is to slow down your reactions. Take a walk or look away from the screen before pressing the hovering Place Order button, Wynne advises. Practice mindfulness, don't just pull the trigger.

In addition, we recommend you flip the script. Turn bored shopping into bored looking. We, too, have found ourselves totally submerged in a sea of e-tail tabs. And, we say, use your wandering eye to your advantage. This is your chance to perfect your eBay search terms, keep tabs on an auction item you've placed a bid on, track down those hard-to-come-by products, or, ya know, read up on the top trends and pieces that are actually worth your hard-earned dinero. Take a moment to make yourself a more informed customer, rather than just the most frequent one.
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Illustrated by Sydney Hass.
The Bummed-Out Buy
You just got dumped. Your friend screwed you over. Your boss gave you the HR boot. All you want are Kleenex, a bottle of wine, and all the shoes you can find. You've been jilted and you deserve it!

Those shoes may not be for naught. Professor Scott Rick of the University of Michigan found in a 2013 study that retail therapy actually can lift the spirits. "Sadness, more than any other negative emotion, is associated with a sense that external forces (e.g., disease, weather) control the important outcomes in one's life," Rick tells us. "Shopping is all about choice, and we find that making shopping choices helps to restore a sense of personal control over one's environment, and thus helps to alleviate sadness." Now, shop away with your sad self, right? Not so much.

While sadness may be treated temporarily with a purchase, it also has shown that it can "increase one's willingness to pay," cites Rick of his research findings. Your decision-making skills may not be the sharpest when you're blue, which can lead you down a dangerous and habit-forming path of spending beyond your means.
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Illustrated by Sydney Hass.
The Solution: Set Your Sights On Something New
Call us suckers for a silver lining, but we're all about Rick's suggestion that purchasing can give you back a little power in your life. Use it for good. And, should you find yourself in these kind of emotionally distraught shopping sprees, set your sights on good things on the horizon: that job interview you just landed, a night out with your very best buddy, a vacation that you totally deserve. Celebrate the good and screw the rest — at least in this moment — and should you make a purchase, make it one that will help steer your future in a brighter direction. You got this.
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Illustrated by Sydney Hass.
The Far-Flung Buy
You're on vacation and you've stumbled upon a local boutique. Okay, make that several boutiques. Problem is: You're traveling on a budget and you don't even really need anything, nor do you particularly have tons of space in you suitcase. But, you can only see two ways out of this situation: buy now, or face shopping FOMO when you get home.

"Restlessness, fatigue, fear and irritability can often be associated with what creates anxious shopping," Wynne tells us. After all, if you've just traveled halfway around the globe, the last thing you want to do is return home with a big, ole carry-on of regret. But, all those scary what-ifs should never overpower your ability to make decisions based on your true desires.
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Illustrated by Sydney Hass.
The Solution: Do Your Research
We'll admit, this quandary is a difficult one for us. And, yes, we've come home from trips with suitcases stuffed before. But, the best solution is to do your research ahead of your potential fear-of-missing-out situation. For starters, stay away from labels that can be bought for less in your home town. Look for those brands that either aren't available back home, or can only be purchased after major markups. Shopping in Paris? Stock on up drugstore labels that cost three times as much in the States. Hitting up Tokyo? Keep your eyes peeled for Comme des Garçons, Sacai, and other Japanese brands that may be less expensive overseas. Know your market, know your conversion rates, and know when to say no.
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Illustrated by Sydney Hass.
The Offer-You-Can't-Refuse Buy
Three words: two for one. Why pass up a good deal when a store is basically giving stuff away? Well, because you don't actually need a fourth pair of strappy, block-heeled sandals (even if they are marked down 70%). We're with you on this one, but we've also learned the hard way that this kind of impulse-buying leads to taking home stuff we'll hardly — maybe never — wear.

Much like bored shopping, this feeling of overexcitement also falls "under the umbrella of sensation-seeking," Rick says. Scoring a deal can give us a huge sense of accomplishment. (Who hasn't done a victory lap around the mall after a particularly good bargain was found?) "This [tendency to shop] also comes from wanting that inflated sense of self-esteem," Wynne adds, "when perhaps other things aren’t going so well."
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Illustrated by Sydney Hass.
The Solution: Be Picky
It's neither easy nor fun to say no to every sale you come across, but start getting picky about when you indulge. We suggest rummaging through all those store e-mails you once signed up for, and services that alert you when an item is getting marked down. Stop buying because an item in on sale, and start making decisions to shop when the pieces you truly want have finally hit the 50-off mark. We assure you: This kind of calculated score will be even sweeter.
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Illustrated by Sydney Hass.
The "Someday" Buy
Not your size, not a problem! You can — and will — lose those five pounds, so your latest skirt purchase will fit like a dream, you'll have an important meeting to wear it to, and all will be right in the world. Or, so you hope.

While a bit of self-improvement is a wonderful thing, as Wynne suggests, living with this kind of hopefulness can make it tough to differentiate between what is realistic and what is fantasy. Rick makes a different point: "[This] reminds me of 'commitment contracts' where people basically make it costly for themselves to fail to meet a goal." While expensive, too-small jeans might inspire action in some, we have a sinking suspicion that — during whatever time they remain unworn — they'll make you feel more mopey than motivated. Investing in a way to work on feeling good now could have better emotional returns.
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Illustrated by Sydney Hass.
The Solution: Aspire To More (Not Less)
We agree that aspirational shopping is not a bad thing — but, we say forget size matters. Focus on buying items that challenge you to step outside your comfort zone a bit, reach for a goal, or make an effort to get out more. Set exciting goals that allow you to participate right away and shop with a new sense of self in mind. And, should your new self also happen to changes sizes, well, be sure to treat her to something that fits when the time is right.
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