6 Things You Should Know About Your Annual Gyno Visit

Illustrated by Jasmin Valcourt.
By Chelsey Delaney

If someone asked me a month ago what a “well-woman visit” is, I would have posited that it’s the magical time of year when you visit your gynecologist and he or she pokes around in your vagina. (Then, I would have followed with the story of the time my gynecologist joked that she couldn’t find my cervix and that it probably fell out somewhere. Gullible was written all over my uterus that day.)

Unfortunately, my explanation wouldn’t have been completely accurate. In fact, for many women, the poking I’m referring to — the pap smear — isn’t required annually. For a woman like me, in the age range of 21 to 29, Paps are recommended every three years as long as there are no other factors that make more frequent Paps necessary. Also, you don’t have to see a gynecologist for a well-woman visit — you can see your primary care doctor, nurse practitioner, etc.

So, what is a well-woman visit? Well, woman, it depends. Here are six basics you should know:


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Illustrated by Jasmin Valcourt.
1. It’s all about preventive health.
Prevention and planning! Going to the doctor only when you’re sick is so last-century. As you age, your body changes and will experience new challenges. A well-woman visit is there for you to understand your own personal health risks and how to readily avoid them.
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Illustrated by Jasmin Valcourt.
2. It’s just like a physical, only it doesn’t have to be as…physical.
Don’t just get tests — ask questions. What’s on your mind? Talk about your stress levels, your nutrition, your mood, your medications, your sex life, your family’s health history — next to nothing is off the table. Asking questions and raising concerns helps your health care provider know what’s important to you and what he or she should screen you for. Speaking of health care providers...
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Illustrated by Jasmin Valcourt.
3. A good relationship with your provider is vital.
More than ever, health care is beginning to embrace the idea that hey, maybe providers and patients should get along and have open dialogues about stuff. Your provider should meet you in the middle and show a genuine interest in your health — no judgments. Allowing yourself to build trust into that relationship will increase the likelihood of a satisfactory visit (and you’ll also feel less awkward when you need a pelvic exam).
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Illustrated by Jasmin Valcourt.
4. It’s not always one-and-done.
While the well-woman visit is often talked about as a single, annual visit, it doesn’t always stop there. For example, if you’ve got a history of breast cancer in your family, your provider might decide that you should get a mammogram. If the mammogram is scheduled at a different time and place, this should also be covered by your insurance. Same deal if you decide to get an IUD or implant — if you need to make a separate appointment for insertion, that should be covered too. Why is this important to know? Because...
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Illustrated by Jasmin Valcourt.
5. You shouldn't be charged for certain preventive services, including well-woman visits.
Don’t touch that wallet if you have health insurance and your provider is covered under your plan. Under the Affordable Care Act, preventive services should be covered by insurance with no out-of-pocket costs. Tip: Be sure to say you’re coming in for a “well-woman visit” when you schedule your appointment(s). And, while it may be tempting to tack your visit onto a sickish-visit with your provider, try to avoid it just to make sure the billing doesn’t get complicated.
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Illustrated by Jasmin Valcourt.
6. The contents of your well-woman visit are up to you and your provider.
As far as services go, your visit(s) could include any/some of the following depending on your current health status:

— Contraceptive counseling
— Alcohol misuse screening
— Blood pressure screening
— Cholesterol screening
— Depression screening
— Nutrition and diet counseling
— HIV screening
— Vaccines and immunizations
— STI screening

You’re entitled to a well-woman visit every year until you’re 65. It’s not that you should stop being a well woman when you’re 65, it’s just that when you’re 65 you’ll have Medicare, and Medicare rules. Hopefully it will act as a reward for being so well for so long!
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