Band Crush: Meet The Chic Offspring Of New Young Pony Club & Air

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Looking for the perfect soundtrack for cinching up your trench and heading out into the crisp night air, oozing Euro-cool confidence? Tomorrow's World, a duo comprised of French pop icon Jean-Benoît Dunckel (a.k.a. JB) of Air and gorg English singer Lou Hayter of New Young Pony Club may be just the thing you need. Hayter's breathy vocals blend with Dunckel's complex electronic sounds to create atmospheric tracks that offer the perfect blend of darkness and glamour.

So far, the pair have only played a scant few shows outside of France, but they're gracing us with their gorgeous presence (and musical talents, obvi) on Saturday night at the French Embassy, headlining Brightest Young Things' French Underground soirée. The two-night affair features a variety of music, both French and local, along with French-inspired food — macarons, anyone? — romantic decor, art, a dancefloor, photobooths, and even a hair-braiding station.

We caught up with Tomorrow's World as they jetted from Paris to Los Angeles for their debut U.S. concert at the Ooh La L.A. festival. Click through to get to know the duo and their inspirations, and find out what it's really like to be a musical ambassador.


Photo: Courtesy of Tomorrow's World/James Kelly
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You've played runway shows and are now working with Kitsuné, the beloved fashion and music label. How would you describe the relationship between music and fashion?
"It feels like art, music, fashion, and film are all connected. Music is our true love, but we admire and follow all of these forms. They complement each other, and the fields overlap whenever they're used together."

Your music has a very evocative, cinematic quality to it. Did you have a visual inspiration in mind when you were creating it?
"When we make music , our minds and bodies fall into a trance. So, we resonate with films, clothes, dreams. Playing music is like being someone else; it's schizophrenic. We like the universe of David Lynch, Jodorowsky, Aronofsky..."

This show in D.C. will be only the fifth you've played outside of France as Tomorrow's World. Is there a strategy to only performing a few concerts rather than launching a full-scale global tour?
"There's no strategy, we just have to do it. We've both played in our other bands for years, so hopefully we'll be okay! And we'd love to come back to Washington when the album is released...if you'll have us!"

How do you feel about performing at the French embassy? Particularly for Lou, as a native of England, will it be an odd experience?
"Yes, I feel like there is so much great music coming out of France at the moment, and I'm really privileged to be part of that scene. I saw JB do a talk with Air recently at the French Embassy in London, and I loved it there, so I'm really looking forward to playing in Washington — it will be an honor."

If you could pick another musician or band as France and England's musical ambassadors in 2012, who would it be?
"For England, Robert Wyatt, and for France, Charlotte Gainsbourg."


Photo: Courtesy of Tomorrow's World/James Kelly