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First Look: The Future Perfect's Cool New S.F. Locale

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    They say when a door closes, another (stellar) one swings open, and that phrase couldn’t be any more true in this city’s ever-changing, head-spinning shopping scene. Case in point: The Future Perfect landing in our very own Pacific Heights hood! The New York City-based boutique has jumped coasts to supply us with its covetable selection of home-décor knicks and knacks. Consider it a house doctor pumping some new life back into your space.

    Inside, you’ll find everything from a colorful coffee table of reclaimed wood and geometrical terrarium cases to ornate baskets and light fixtures that could have easily been taken off the set of a sci-fi flick.

    If you missed the opening launch a few nights ago, don’t trip — we’ve got detailed snaps of the shop so you can ogle the quirky treasures right here, right now! And, after visiting the kitschy space, your abode’s future prospects should be as close to perfection as it gets.

    The Future Perfect, 3085 Sacramento Street (at Baker Street); 415-932-6508.

    Photographed by Anna-Alexia Basile

    Photographed by

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