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Timo Weiland And Lizzie Fortunato's Guide To Charleston's Southern Charm

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    Around these parts (a.k.a. R29 HQ), we know Timo Weiland as one of the coolest NYC designers with collections that keep us on the edges of our seats. But there's more to the curly haired designer than just the city he calls home.

    Leaving the Big Apple, Weiland recently headed down to Charleston, SC this past month, and not just to revisit a town he's frequented way before we knew his name. He, along with Lizzie and Kathryn Fortunato hosted a killer trunk show and party at premiere SC boutique, Hampden Clothing.

    Sadly, we missed the main event, but Weiland and the Fortunato duo kept us in the loop with a fantastic travel diary.Worth noting: We were pleasantly surprised and intrigued to find out that Charleston — a mere hour-and-a-half flight from NYC — is home to some of the coolest shopping, foodies, and tourist destinations. With travel highlights from these insiders, we're suddenly suspecting our lives may be lacking in Southern hospitality. Check out Weiland, the Fortunatos, and Hampden Clothing boutique owner Stacy Smallwood's account of all things chic and charming in Charleston (plus, a recap of the party that rocked the small town).
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