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This New Loungewear Line Will Make You Give Up Pants For The Weekend

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    Do it. Push the snooze button one more time. Cancel breakfast lunch plans. You don't need an excuse to hang out in your undies all day because you work hard, and if a day of PJs is what you want, then a day of PJs is what you deserve. This is exactly how Sleepy Jones, the newest loungewear line from Andy Spade, makes us feel.

    According to the brand's mantra, the line is all about wearing what makes you feel at ease, and not wearing what just gets in the way. Yes, sometimes, that's pants. Or bras. And, having just launched this week, Sleepy Jones also claims to be inspired by "David Hockney, Pablo Picasso, and Jean Seberg, who didn't work and create in suits and ties, but rather, they wore what was comfortable." And if that means just a pair of boxer shorts, so be it.

    While we may not spend this weekend running outdoors topless with a friend or cleaning out our car in our undies (sorry, neighbors), this new lookbook makes us believe that, hey, it's okay if you do. Stay comfy and click ahead for the whole men and women's collection.

    Photo: Courtesy of Sleepy Jones

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