Why Does It Feel Like You Have To Pee During Sex?

19 comments

pee-02Illustrated by Sandy Ley.
Beyond serving as a go-to source for vital reproductive care, the folks at Planned Parenthood— a team of experts in medicine, sexual health, and law — are passionate, informed advocates for knowing your own body. This week, PP's very own Kendall McKenzie teaches us why it sometimes feels like you have to pee during sex.

Someone asked us:
"OKAY! I’ve been scrolling though your blog for a while and I finally figured out what i [sic] wanted to ask! Every now and then when I have sex with my boyfriend, I get a sensation to urinate. It had been happening for a while, so I started going to the bathroom before we had sex to figure out of [sic] that was really it, but it still happens. I even tried refraining from drinking any liquids before meeting up with him, but it’s the same thing. Is something wrong with me?"

Good news: You’re totes fine! A chat about anatomy can clear this mystery right up. Here’s the deal: People with vaginas have tissue surrounding the urethra (the tube inside that pee comes out through), called the urethral sponge. It’s similar to the erectile tissue found in penises. You’re probably more familiar with the urethral sponge’s famous nickname: the G-spot. During arousal and stimulation, this tissue swells and becomes more sensitive. That can put pressure on the urethra and cause the “gotta go” feeling.

The urethral sponge also has glands that fill with fluid, and because of this some people with vaginas actually ejaculate. Even though this fluid is not pee, it fills and comes out through the urethra, so it kinda feels like peeing.

So, most likely what’s going on is your boyfriend is stimulating your G-spot/urethral sponge during sex, and you might even be on the verge of ejaculating. Many people who’ve experienced G-spot stimulation and ejaculation (also known as female ejaculation or squirting) are familiar with the feeling you’re describing, and commonly mistake it for having to pee also. But, if you empty your bladder before sex, like you said you do, you can be pretty confident that you’re simply experiencing some good ol’ G-spot action.
Beyond serving as a go-to source for vital reproductive care, the folks at Planned Parenthood— a team of experts in medicine, sexual health, and law — are passionate, informed advocates for knowing your own body. Planned Parenthood's very own Kendall McKenzie is here to tackle the big issues.