This Is Our Jam: Widowspeak, Blood Diamonds, & A 22-Minute Arcade Fire Fest

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jamPhoto: Courtesy of The Juan Maclean; Courtesy of Blood Diamonds; Courtesy of Kwes; Courtesy of Widowspeak.
Welcome to another installment of This Is Our Jam, where we highlight our favorite tracks of the week for your listening pleasure. We kick things off with a 22-minute YouTube film from Arcade Fire featuring three new songs and loads of guest stars. Then we have a new house number from DFA staple The Juan Maclean (with a little help from LCD Soundsystem's Nancy Whang), new music from U.K. singer/producer Kwes, an airy new track from Blood Diamonds, and a Nancy Sinatra-esque slow-burner from Widowspeak. Hope you dig 'em!

Arcade Fire
"Here Comes the Night Time"
After Arcade Fire's SNL guest spot last week, viewers were treated to a three-song Roman Coppola-directed mini-movie with all new material and guest stars, including Aziz Ansari, Ben Stiller, Michael Cera, Bono, and more. Few bands today could pull something with such star power while coming off as so pleasantly unpretentious. And, the new songs are all great, by the way.



The Juan Maclean
"Feel Like Movin"
Whenever The Juan Maclean teams up with former LCD Soundsystem member Nancy Whang, sparks seem to fly. "Feel Like Movin" is an old-school house jam with piano and seemingly generic lyrics that somehow make the track pop even more. "Put your feet on the dance floor / Show me what you're made of," sings Whang.



Kwes
"Cablecar"
"Cablecar" is a sprawling, ambitious new track from British crooner R&B crooner Kwes. At eight minutes, the track's production has hints of James Blake, but Kwes' voice is all his own.



Blood Diamonds
"Osaka"
Though driven by marimba — an instrument we usually associate with sunny days on the beach — "Osaka" is a deceptively heavy affair. Blood Diamonds, who recently signed to Skrillex's record label OWSLA, is only getting more ambitious with each new production.



Widowspeak
"Calico"
"Calico" is a swampy new cut from Brooklyn two-piece Widowspeak. Singer Molly Hamilton is typically enchanting, but it's guitarist Robert Earl Thomas that really establishes the Americana-tinged mood.