A Vintage Hairstyle You’ll Want To Wear NOW

Photographed by Jacqueline Harriet.
They say that what's old is new again. Just look at the '90s revival that's been happening since, well, the '90s. At the fall shows, though, the vibe was less grunge and more retro glam circa 1940s — and this victory roll-inspired hairstyle we spotted around NYC is proof that the trend has hit the streets.

To get a similar look, hairstylist Erica Whelan says to start with a generous spritz of soft hairspray, like Pantene Flexible Hold Hairspray, so you can still style your strands without that dreaded crunch. Create a deep side-part from the highest part of either brow to the top of the crown. Then, make a slightly messy center part down the back of your head; separate the two sections of hair. This messy part is a cool way of adding edge to an otherwise prim hairstyle.

Now, split each chunk of hair into two smaller sections — one on top, one on bottom. Starting with one of the top sections, twirl the hair away from the ear. Then, add in the bottom section so you end up with one large roll at the nape of the neck. Slip a few curved French or U-shaped pins horizontally into the seam where the twist touches your head and secure with a small elastic. Then, pull out a small section of hair from the other side (we'll get to this in a sec) and repeat. Finally, wrap the two elastics with that leftover section of hair and pin in place.

This 'do can easily be done on different hair textures and lengths because it works with your strands instead of needing heat-styling tools. And, if you have layers, leave 'em alone — any pieces that fall out when you twist will just keep the look feeling effortless.

So, are you ready to roll?

Runway hairstyles have a track record of being too intricate and fashion-y for everyday wear. Au contraire. With the help of Pantene, we're stalking the streets of New York to find the coolest runway-inspired hairstyles IRL and then breaking down how to get them in our new column, Hair Watch. Read up, and stay one curl and twist ahead of the crowd.
Photographed by Jacqueline Harriet.
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