The Subtle Way To Make Your Cutoffs Stand Out

Photographed by Victor Prado.
It was a long, cold winter, but — hallelujah — the time has finally come to break out the tank tops and short shorts. Looking at our love-worn cutoffs this year, though, it just feels like something's missing. Now, don't get us wrong: There's a lot of life left in these frayed go-tos. We just think we could give 'em a little more personality. Fortunately, we've got the scoop on a denim embellishment that anyone can handle — yes, even if you still ask your dry-cleaner to sew on your loose buttons.

Inspired by our Levi's® 501® Shorts, we came up with an embroidered, pocket-perking DIY that's so quick you can replicate it in the time it'd take you to pick up a new pair. And, if you snag one of our Denim Hacks kits (available at Levi's stores in early May), it gets even easier. Ready to try it for yourself? Grab your favorite denim shorts, put your mom on speaker (what better time to finally call her back?), and get ready to enter the ranks of the DIY literate.
1 of 8
Photographed by Victor Prado.
You'll Need:
-Scissors
-Embroidery thread in whatever color you want
-Embroidery needle
-Embroidery pen (optional)
-Denim cutoffs (we used Levi's 501 Shorts in Boomtown)
Advertisement
2 of 8
Photographed by Victor Prado.
Step 1: Lay your cutoffs flat, with the front side facing up.
3 of 8
Photographed by Victor Prado.
Step 2: Using your fabric pen, line the inside seam from grommet to grommet.
4 of 8
Photographed by Victor Prado.
Step 3: Measure about two feet of thread (you may need more, but the longer the thread is, the longer each stitch will take), and thread your needle by slipping the thread through the needle's eye. It may take a few tries. Knot both ends of the thread several times.
5 of 8
Photographed by Victor Prado.
Step 4: Start sewing at the outer corner of the pocket, on the inside and under the grommet. You may need to pull the outer part of the pocket away from the inner part in order to reach the grommet.
6 of 8
Photographed by Victor Prado.
Step 5: Continue stitching across the pocket, keeping stitches as close together as possible. If, at any point, you come close to running out of thread, tie a knot on the inside and thread your needle with another 1 to 2 feet of thread. Repeat on the other pocket.
7 of 8
Photographed by Victor Prado.
Step 6: When you reach the grommet on the opposite side of each pocket, knot the thread several times so it'll stay put.
8 of 8
Photographed by Victor Prado.
Step 7: Admire your handiwork, and start planning your new outfit.
Advertisement