The 3 Coolest Dressing Rooms In S.F. — Can We Move In?

If there's one thing we're passionate about, it's the tiny details that make any experience extra special. To that end, we've already scoured the city to find the coolest restaurant bathrooms (seriously, they're stunning), and now we're turning our eyes to another oft-overlooked nook, in-store fitting rooms. Sure, while most shops in town don't put too much thought into these little changing corners, we wanted to laud the boutiques that have crafted such covetable coves that we wouldn't mind holing up in these dressing dens long-term.
Surprisingly all nestled in the Mission, these top three spots feature old Hollywood lighting, hand-painted floors, custom woodwork by local artists, and loads of rustic-cool embellishments. Want to find out where you're going to want to strip down, stat? The totally inspiring guide awaits.
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Freemans Sporting Club
The dressing room for the tiny Freemans Sporting Club was born from trying to find creative solutions for the shop's limited square footage. Nestled on the far wall of the store, the area is a continuation of the rustic-cool theme shown in the rest of the shop and acts as an additional space to display merch. Therefore, the 8.5 oz waxed-cotton curtains, made out of the same material as FSC's Isle of Man parka, are often left open to create the illusion of a bigger shop, and a shelf above the changing room holds stacks of records and overstock. Double-duty!
Freemans Sporting Club, 696 Valencia Street (at 18th Street); 415-863-2155.

Photographed by Maria del Rio
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FSC's West Coast Director Riki Bryan created the room's bookshelf with a slab of wood his arborist friend and client gave to him. Now it's stacked with dude-centric books and oversized pine cones.

Photographed by Maria del Rio
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A head-to-toe look at the rad space. The homemade psychedelic diptych was a flea market find. "The dressing room falls in line with the design concept we were going for [overall]," says Bryan. "It's sort of a Northern Californian, hippie-modern, handcrafted aesthetic, inspired by the landscape and artists like J.B. Blunk and Donald Judd. Nothing too precious, but more like functional, warm, and comfortable.”

Photographed by Maria del Rio
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Gravel & Gold
"A big, lovely dressing room with 'Miss Piggy' lighting was a necessary component of our shop design," says Gravel & Gold's co-owner Cassie McGettigan. "But because we sell mostly non-clothing items, it sits unused a lot of the time. So, our friend Otis Kaltvedt, who helped us build out the space, came up with the idea to make a pop-out section that could function as a bar when we have food-related events. It's worked really great. The food or beverage folks set up in the dressing room and pass out dishes through the opening. That way they can hide their prep materials and still have close access to the sink in the bathroom."
Gravel & Gold, 3266 21st Street (between Valencia and Mission streets); 415-552-0112.

Photographed by Maria del Rio
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An inside look at the space, with the pop-out window closed. Artist Sarina Eastman was commissioned to paint the floors in a colorful, washed-out mosaic, Eri Kawaguchi created a hummingbird stained-glass piece, an Eames "hang-it-all" rack holds all the clothes, and wool blankets add some additional color to the space.

Photographed by Maria del Rio
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Voyager
Inspired by the aesthetic of Voyager's Mollusk Surf Shop pop-up store, designed by R29 fave Jay Nelson, (Mollusk has since closed and Needles & Pens has moved in), this "escape pod changing room," as owner Robert Patterson calls it, was "built in a similar cartoon-y, psychedelic, Big Sur, alternative Earth, Louis Khan style, using salvaged materials." Patterson, along with Voyager staffers Jonathan Hoyt and Megan Thomas, created the dressing area in a shape reminiscent of the escape pod of a submarine.
Voyager, 365 Valencia Street (between 14th and 15th streets); 415-779-2712.

Photographed by Maria del Rio
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Sparse art decorates the interior of the pod.

Photographed by Maria del Rio
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The reclaimed wood is a rugged backdrop for Voyager's crisp clothing options and cool hand-made blankets.

Photographed by Maria del Rio
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