DIY Pinatas Just In Time For Cinco De Mayo

Commemorating the Battle of Puebla, an important David-versus-Goliath-type battle in Mexico's quest for independence from France, Cinco de Mayo is one of our favorite holidays, even if it doesn't come with an extra day off from work. In the US, it's a time to celebrate Mexican heritage and tradition with all our friends… beginning with a little history lesson and ending with a round (or five) or margaritas. One of our favorite ways to commemorate the day is by making — and then destroying — a homemade piñata. We've got some handy step-by-step guides to creating two gorgeous piñatas that are pretty enough to save from assault — trust, you'll want to display 'em in your casa all year round. Click through and check this DIY out! Olé!
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Here are the two piñatas we're going to show you how to craft. Making these is almost as fun as destroying them later!

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The Ombre Petal Globe

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What you'll need...

Newspaper
One punching balloon
Box cutter
A variety of colored tissue paper
Scissors
Two bowls
Flour
Rope
Glue
Spoon
Candy or toys 
Masking tape

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Step 1: Inflate the punching balloon and tie a knot to close.

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Step 2: Make an 'X' with masking tape over the top of the balloon to flatten down the pointed balloon end.

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Step 3: Cut a bunch of two inch strips of newspaper.

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Step 4: Lay down newspaper on your work surface. Things are about to get messy.

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Step 5: Fill one bowl with flour.

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Step 6: Add water, then stir to create a paste. Keep adding more water until you get the consistency of pancake batter.

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Step 7: Use the second bowl as a base to hold the balloon while you paper mache it.

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Step 8: Dip one paper strip into the bowl of flour paste.

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Step 9: Use your fingers to spread along the back of the newspaper.

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Step 10: Start by making an 'X' with the paste-covered newspaper strips over the top of the balloon.

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Step 11: Continue covering the balloon pulling the strips tight. You can also add the paste mix on top of the newspaper to secure it even further. Cover the entire balloon three times over to make a sturdy piñata.

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Step 12: Let the balloon dry overnight, flipping it every few hours to make sure it doesn't adhese to the bowl.

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Step 13: Use the box cutter to cut a small hole on the top right side of the dried piñata. Make a second small hole on the top left side.

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Step 14: Cut a softball-sized hole in the top part of the piñata. Don't throw the cut out section away — you still need that!

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Step 15: Pull the balloon out from the inside.

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Step 16: Stick the rope into the small hole you made on the top right side of the piñata.

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Step 17: Using the large hole in the middle, guide the rope out the small upper-left hole. You'll use this rope to hang it!

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Step 18: Reinforce the small holes with masking tape. These holes will bear a lot of weight when the piñata is hanging, so you want it to be sturdy.

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Step 19: Fill the piñata with all the goodies.

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Step 20: Tape the softball-sized cut-out section back onto the piñata.

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Step 21: Now you can start decorating! Cut three-inch strips of tissue paper.

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Step 22: Accordion fold the paper strips to create a square.

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Step 23: Starting 1/2 inch down, cut a half-circle shape ending the same distance you started the cut.

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Step 24: This leaves you with strips of petal-shaped scallops!

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Step 25: Start glueing the tissue paper on the piñata by making a small spiral of glue on the top.

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Step 26: Tear off a few of the 'petals' from the strip you made.

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Step 27: Place four petals in a circle on the glue.

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Step 28: Add more petals towards the top, pinching the bottom to make them stand up. Add more glue for each layer.

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Step 29: Press down in the middle to make sure they're firmly attached.

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Step 30: On the next strip of scalloped tissue paper, fold the top down 1/4 inch.

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Step 31: Add small dots of glue along this folded line.

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Step 32: Lifting up the bottom layer of tissue petals, wrap the scalloped strip of tissue paper along the base of the existing petals.

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Step 33: Place single tissue petals in any gaps that need to be filled.

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Step 34: Work around the holes where the rope is located.

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Step 35: After working down a few rows of yellow, now you can switch to the next color!

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Step 36: Repeat steps 21 - 24 with the new color

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Step 37: Again, add glue to the back of scalloped tissue paper strip.

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Step 38: Glue the top of this strip below the base of the last row glued down.

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Step 39: Continue adding strips until you're ready to change colors again. Repeat steps 30 - 38 until you've completely covered the piñata in tissue paper.

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All done! Now, go bash it in.

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The Laser-Cut Prism

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What you'll need...

Eight pieces of cardboard
  Eight laser-cut Mexican flags
Box cutter
Ruler
Sharpie
Rope
Masking tape
Mod Podge
Black acrylic paint
One paint brush
Candy!

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Step 1: Draw a 12-inch line in the middle of your cardboard.

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Step 2: Make a mark at 4 inches.

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Step 3: Draw a 10-inch perpendicular line at the four-inch mark you just made. It should be centered so there are five inches on either side of the 12 inch vertical line.

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Step 4: Connect the ends of each line to form a kite shape.

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Step 5: This is the shape you should end up with!

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Step 6: Using a box cutter, trace the outline of the shape on a cutting mat. Use this as a pattern to cut seven more panels out of cardboard. 

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Step 7: You should have a total of eight pieces of kite shaped cardboard. These are the panels you'll use to create the piñata.

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Step 8: Place large tabs of masking tape on the sides of one cardboard diamond.

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Step 9: Line up a second pannel mirroring the first pannel at a 45 degree angle, and secure the tape. Don't forget to make sure the ends match up!

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Step 10: Continue adding panels, securing the edges as you go. 

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Step 11: To fit in the top, flip the diamond upside down to match up with the other panels. 

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Step 12: Continue building your 3D diamond until you've put together seven panels, leaving one side open.

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Step 13: Reinforce the inside seams by adding tabs of masking tape to the seams between the panels on the inside of the piñata.

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Step 14: Make large knots at the end of your rope. You might need to make sure it's wide enough to stay trapped inside the cardboard pieces.

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Step 15: Tape the knot at the top of your diamond and secure with multiple pieces of tape.

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Step 17: Add handfuls of candy, toys, or anything you want to rain down when you break the piñata open.

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Step 17: Once you've filled the inside with goodies, tape on the last panel of the diamond.

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Step 18: Go back around the diamond and reinforce the edges with more tape. Make sure you tape down any gaps between the cardboard.

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Step 19: Circle the top of the diamond with masking tape where the rope is. You don't want it to come undone while you're swinging the bat!

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Step 20: Use even more masking tape to reinforce the seams and smooth out the edges.

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Step 21: Now that you have the shape, it's time to start decorating. Paint the entire piñata black with acrylic paint.

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Step 22: If you're using colored rope to hang the piñata like we did, cover it with tape while you're painting to keep it clean.

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Step 23: After the black paint has completely dried, paint a layer of Mod Podge onto one of the panels.

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Step 24: Place one flag on top of the Mod Podge, making sure to line up the design with the angles of the diamond.

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Step 26: Cut off any excess paper.

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Step 26: Paper each side of the piñata until all are covered.

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Now, get to whackin'!

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