How-To: DIY Hanging Wall Planters

Photo: Courtesy of Ivan Solis/ DesignLoveFest.
Our stylist Natalie came up with this genius DIY for wall-hanging planters. You can use air-dry clay, so no need to get crazy with ceramic throwing, and you can make them at home with very few tools.

Check out the how-to, ahead.

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Photo: Courtesy of Ivan Solis/ DesignLoveFest.
What You’ll Need:
Air-dry clay (we used Crayola)
Rolling pin
Canvas, about 18 by 24 inches
X-Acto knife
Ceramic pin tool (available at arts-and-crafts stores)
Sandpaper
Craft or spray paint
Tissue paper, or newsprint and drawing paper
Small sponge
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Photo: Courtesy of Ivan Solis/ DesignLoveFest.
Instructions
1. Make a pattern of the shape you want your plant pocket to be. Make two of the exact same shape by tracing your shape, and then cut the top off of one in a nice rounded shape — that piece will serve as the front of your pocket. Round and oval shapes work best, and they can be perfect or irregular — whatever you like.
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Photo: Courtesy of Ivan Solis/ DesignLoveFest.
2. Roll two balls of clay into about the size of a fist in-between a folded piece of canvas, until they are about a quarter inch thick. Note: Rolling the clay on canvas will keep it from sticking to your work table and make it easier to pick up.

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Photo: Courtesy of Ivan Solis/ DesignLoveFest.
4. Cut out each pattern piece from your flattened clay with an X-Acto knife (clay is surprisingly easy to cut with a sharp blade).
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Photo: Courtesy of Ivan Solis/ DesignLoveFest.
5. With the pin tool, make score marks along all the edges where your two pieces will meet to form your pocket.
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Photo: Courtesy of Ivan Solis/ DesignLoveFest.
6. On your front piece, attach the coil to the area that you have scored. Add a little water to the clay to help the coil stick to the other piece of clay; score the top of the attached coil as well.
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Photo: Courtesy of Ivan Solis/ DesignLoveFest.
7. Cut a piece of drawing paper slightly smaller, but in the same shape as your front pattern piece. It doesn’t need to be perfect — just enough to cover the surface of the exposed clay inside the coil area. This will help keep your two clay pieces from touching when you join them and help you keep the shape smooth.
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Photo: Courtesy of Ivan Solis/ DesignLoveFest.
8. With a sponge, put a little water on the coil and the scored part of the other piece of clay.

9. Crumple a little piece of newsprint or tissue paper, and put it on the large, flat piece of clay. This will help you create the shape of the pocket when you join the two pieces.

10. Now, you get to join your two pieces! When you have them lined up so all the edges are in the right place, pinch them together kind of like a pie crust.
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Photo: Courtesy of Ivan Solis/ DesignLoveFest.
11. With your sponge, smooth all the edges and surfaces. If your edge is a little bumpy from pinching it, run the pin tool along it and take off any small pieces.

12. Shape your pocket, and put in extra tissue paper if necessary to keep it propped up while drying. After the clay has dried for an hour or so, you can put your last finishing touches on the pocket shape and smooth it all out one last time.
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Photo: Courtesy of Ivan Solis/ DesignLoveFest.
13. After your clay is dry (how long this takes depends on climate conditions where you are; in Southern California, we find it takes a day or two), you can smooth your pocket even more with sandpaper. Use a medium grit first to take down any lumps or bumps, and a fine grit to smooth before painting.

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Photo: Courtesy of Ivan Solis/ DesignLoveFest.
14. We used white spray paint and colored craft paint to finish ours, but you can really do anything. Dots, stripes, all-white — it’s up to you!
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Photo: Courtesy of Ivan Solis/ DesignLoveFest.
15. You'll want to use a clear acrylic spray to seal your paint, since you will probably need to water your plants. Be sure to read all directions on paint-dry time, so your project stands the test of time.
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Photo: Courtesy of Ivan Solis/ DesignLoveFest.
We decided to use succulents, as they require less water and still look great, but the plant selection is up to you.
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Photo: Courtesy of Ivan Solis/ DesignLoveFest.
This project will easily dress up your space. Have fun, and show us what you end up creating!

I’m excited to be partnering with Boots beauty on this DIY post. The brand has an amazing line of plant-based skin-care products that are not only affordable, but can accomplish some serious skin improvement. Some office favorites are the All Bright Balm (makes you look like you slept eight hours!), the facial oil, and the toner, which magically doesn’t bother my sensitive skin.

Next: DIY Gold-Foil Pillow
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