10 Women Reveal Their Most Regrettable Purchases

Illustrated by Sydney Hass.
Some big purchases leave you feeling elated: that new car or the couch you’ve been saving up for. But what about when that splurge turns into a mistake you wish you could immediately take back? We asked DailyWorth readers to tell us about their most regrettable purchases — and oh, did they spill.

“I regret spending $1,500 on a plane ticket to meet my then-boyfriend in Southeast Asia on the last leg of a backpacking summer trip. I thought we were going to spend two weeks catching up, being in love, and exploring a new country together. But instead, I found out halfway through our vacation that he had been cheating on me the whole time he was away. The rest of the trip was spent feeling like a fool, hiding out from him, and being completely livid about the whole situation. We broke up on the plane ride home.” — Lulu, 40

“I once purchased a gorgeous $500 white silk jumpsuit because I thought it made me look like Beyoncé. In truth, it kind of did. But I consequently learned that even looking like Beyoncé wasn’t worth the $500 plus tax I had dropped. I felt so ill spending that amount of money on something as singular as a jumpsuit (as opposed to, say, a winter coat), that I couldn’t even enjoy it. I returned it the next day much to the perplexity of the sales associates who said the jumpsuit was clearly made for me. Or Beyoncé.” — Lydia, 28

Related: Money Experts On Their Biggest Financial Mistakes

“I was living in London and saw a carpet beetle, which is harmless and very common — it's like a moth. But it sort of vaguely looks like a bedbug. So I spent six hours googling bedbugs and then had a complete breakdown in front of my roommates. I ended up paying £150 to an exterminator to tell me I didn't have bedbugs. It was crazy embarrassing and my roommates still tease me about it to this day.” — Hannah, 42
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Illustrated by Sydney Hass.
“Throughout college, I spent a ridiculous amount of time researching, purchasing, and reselling designer bags. I got my first job when I was 18 and for some reason, thought blowing every paycheck on expensive stuff was a good idea. I ended up dropping around $700 on a Louis Vuitton Speedy. I was never happy with the bag itself and I ended up selling it a few weeks later. Whenever I think about that particular purchase, I cringe.” — Aimee, 28

“Private college. I was 17, stupid, and had no concept of the fact that I'd be paying for my visual arts degree forever. Lest you think I've wised up: I'm heading to another private university for a graduate degree. Help.” — Julia, 26
"Small impulse buys, like clothes that are made of synthetic fibers and are cheaply made, all of which add up to an absurd amount of money that I don't want to think about." — Hailey, 24

“I went to Paris for two weeks when I graduated college. I really wanted to splurge on a French fashion item, thinking it would be a special memento from my trip. Who knew the next time I'd be in Paris? And I'm an adult now, so I should dress fancy (and every other reason or excuse possible). Well, I spent $400 on a pair of shoes that I never wore. Even now, in my thirties, I’d never spend that much on shoes. I can't believe I spent that when I was younger (and poorer) — I could have used that money for a weekend trip to the French countryside, or opera tickets, or an amazing meal, or a hotel upgrade...or, you know, just saved it. Such a waste.” — Vera, 39

Illustrated by Sydney Hass.
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Related: 7 Money Habits You Need To Start Doing Now

“I impulsively purchased a $500 leather jacket in the middle of June. I haven't been able to wear it because it's been consistently 90 degrees. Go figure.” — Caroline, 23

“Anything I ever bought because I wanted to make myself feel better about something else. You know what will never, ever lift a bad mood? Trying on jeans. I've learned that lesson the hard way many times. Just go home and do a kickboxing workout until the endorphins are flowing. You save money AND you get to uppercut your frustration away.” — Katie, 32

“When I first moved to New York, I joined a co-working space. I paid for, like, six months and maybe went twice. I kept thinking I'd go and be so productive and make connections. But predictably, that didn’t happen.” — Camilla, 35


Next: 6 Spending Strategies That Can Help You Save More
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