How This Couple Makes Their Tiny Studio Feel So Much Bigger

Photo: Courtesy of Apartment Therapy.
Margaret and Tim's Brooklyn loft is a dream of an apartment: Although it's only 650 square feet, its high ceilings and ample light make it seem much bigger. Their building, which in a past life was a pencil factory, has plenty of interesting details: exposed brick, concrete floors, richly textured wood ceilings. Margaret and Tim have layered in lots of rugs, patterns, and interesting pieces, for a look that's warm, stylish, and welcoming.

The apartment is technically a studio, but the alcove next to the front door, separated from the rest of the apartment by an Ikea bookcase that also provides book and record storage, stands in nicely as a bedroom. The rest of the apartment is really just one room, a lofty and multi-functional space that serves as living room, dining room, kitchen, and music room all in one. Click through to take a look around.

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Photo: Courtesy of Apartment Therapy.
Margaret's idea is to focus less on decorating and more on surrounding yourself with things you really love. She's also a bit of a thrift shopper, having spent hours scouring eBay for some of the rugs seen through the space.
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Photo: Courtesy of Apartment Therapy.
The couple told Apartment Therapy that their inspirations include "maximalist rich lady apartments (like Nan Kempner, Gloria Vanderbilt, and Iris Apfel), '60s modernism, Wallace Collection, and the period rooms at The Met."
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Photo: Courtesy of Apartment Therapy.
The pieces all come together as if they wanted to be together all along, in that wonderful, serendipitous way that good decorators make seem effortless.
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Photo: Courtesy of Apartment Therapy.
They admit that "moving from a two-bedroom apartment to a no-bedroom apartment" was the biggest challenge they faced. "Many chairs were sacrificed! Many possessions hidden under the bed!"
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Photo: Courtesy of Apartment Therapy.
"Nothing in the apartment was remotely expensive," they explain. Most of their rugs were found on eBay, while other items came from Craigslist, vintage stores, and flea markets. The surprising benefit? "Not being able to get exactly what you want can add to the personality of a place."
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Photo: Courtesy of Apartment Therapy.
Another view of the apartment's living space.
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Photo: Courtesy of Apartment Therapy.
Their favorite part of the apartment? "High ceilings with exposed beams. Makes us feel lofty."
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Photo: Courtesy of Apartment Therapy.
And what's their advice for getting a similar Insta-worthy pad? They told Apartment Therapy they recommend "surround[ing] yourself with things you authentically like (even if they're extremely ugly). If you spend time cultivating your interests rather than 'decorating,' your home will be a real reflection of your tastes."

This article originally appeared on ApartmentTherapy.com. It is reprinted here with permission.
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