We Taste Tested Avocado Toast From Popular Chains So You Didn't Have To

Avocado toast is the food world's version of a polarizing fashion trend. Some call it basic, others could take or leave the menu item, and still others order and social media the shit out of it on the daily. Will the smooth spread on crusty bread ever go out of style? Hate it or love it, avocado toast doesn't seem to be going anywhere anytime soon. So, we decided to jump on the undecided avocado bandwagon and conduct a taste test with the menu offerings from three different popular, fast-casual chains.

Scroll on to share in our savory findings — from avocado quality to bread taste, texture, toppings and more. You may be just as surprised as we were to discover the creamy winner.

Photo: Courtesy of Le Pain Quotidien.
Le Pain Quotidien (Most Expensive)
Avocado Toast, $11.25
Photo: Courtesy of Elizabeth Buxton.
Le Pain Quotidien

Avocado
While the avocado spread technique was a plus (the toast featured a smear topped with individual slices), the flavor lacked saltiness and overall zest. Although a lemon slice helped a bit to brighten the overall taste, it still fell short.

Bread
The serving of bread was large and well sliced for bite size-friendly munching, but the sourdough bread overpowered the avocado flavor. The bread was also on the thinner side and not crusty enough to stand up to the spread without becoming a bit soggy.

Toppings/Extras
LPQ's version was topped with chia seeds and accompanied by a lightly dressed shredded kale and carrot salad. While the side salad added a bit more flavor to the toast when lumped on top, the chia seeds seemed to be more of a trendy flourish and didn't add anything in the taste or texture departments.

Best For
A quick and easy, on-the-go breakfast option. While we won't necessarily be going out of our purchase this avo-option, it was still fulfilling in its own right and would have been downright tasty with a squirt of Sriracha.
Photo: Courtesy of Starbucks.
Starbucks (Least Expensive)
Avocado Spread, $0.95 (plus optional/additional $1.50 for a toasted bagel/bread option)
Photo: Courtesy of Elizabeth Buxton.
Starbucks

Avocado
Starbucks' spread comes prepackaged and sold separately in a sealed container. It truly looked and tasted like a "spread" — there were no avocado chunks and it's obvious from the flavor that the avocados are not being mashed to order. It did not taste bad, but it also did not taste well-seasoned (or like fresh avocados).

Bread
We went with a toasted bagel option and were underwhelmed; cream cheese spread would have been the superior breakfast move.

Toppings/Extras
None.

Best For
The prepackaged spread was bland, but it wasn't bad — this avo-option would best be served as a creamy addition to a sandwich.
Just Salad
Avocado Blast Toast, $8.99
Photo: Courtesy of Elizabeth Buxton.
Just Salad

Avocado
The avocado on both toasts tasted well-seasoned (salty, zesty, and fresh) with an ideal smear texture: smooth with small avocado chunks peppered throughout.

Bread
Very thick and crusty — so much so that even thought it was only very lightly toasted, the bread had a delightful crunch and held up well to the spread without getting soggy

Toppings/Extras
We opted for a slice of each of Just Salad's two toast flavors: the first was covered with grilled corn and pickled red onions and the second was topped with fried shallots, feta, and pepitas. Both had a lot going on (hence the word "Blast" in the menu description). That being said, each flavor profile came together in a notably delicious way.

Best For
While these two toasts (each order comes withtwo slices) were on point with taste, texture, and toppings, there was still a lot happening here — perhaps a bit too much for a fast and easy breakfast on-the-go. We'd recommend picking up Just Salad's 'cado blast for lunch instead — or maybe splitting the order with a friend.
The Winner: Just Salad
Just Salad won by an avocado landslide. The harmonious flavors and textures made us want to make the offering part of our purchased lunch rotation. Although the other two options weren't bad, they also weren't exciting enough that we'd want to buy them in lieu of just making avocado toast ourselves. If you can whip it up at home just as well, or perhaps even better, it probably isn't worth the price when you're out and about. It's the toppings and fixings that make the meal worth a splurge (and a social media post, if you're into that).