The Good, The Bad & The Confusing From Ivanka Trump In 2017

2017 solidified Ivanka Trump's status as one of the most powerful first children in the history of the United States.

The first daughter left the comforts of her home in New York City to relocate to Washington, D.C. with her family, where she eventually joined her father's administration as a special assistant to the president. She's had a hand helping shape her father's agenda, though she took on a huge portfolio of her own.

Throughout it all, Ivanka has been perhaps one of the most divisive figures of the Trump era: She's adored by many, who see her as the embodiment of brains and beauty, an ideal success story, and a role model who advocates for women. On the flip side, she's derided by critics who hoped she would be a moderating force in the White House but now see her as someone who enables what they think is her father's destructive policies.

For her, the criticism is just "noise" that she won't pay attention to, which has been proven by her uncanny ability to compartmentalize and push forward with her plans. Which means that her 2017 has been quite eventful to say the least.

We tried to break down what this year was like for Ivanka Trump — but this list is, of course, incomplete. (The first daughter was unable to comment for this story). However, we've compiled a breakdown of some of the most important moments that marked her 2017 — based on news reports, her social media, and White House events.

illustrated by Anna Sudit.
At the beginning of the year, Ivanka and her family moved to the Kalorama neighborhood in Washington, D.C. (You know, the same one where the Obamas took up residence after leaving the White House.) She also stepped down from her roles at the Trump Organization and her own company, where Abigail Klem took over as president.
illustrated by Anna Sudit.
She reportedly organized a meeting between her father and Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, in which the leaders announced the creation of the Canada-United States Council for Advancement of Women Entrepreneurs and Business Leaders. In that same spirit, she also hosted a private dinner for a group of CEOs at her new home to discuss potential policies surrounding issues such as women in the workforce and paid family leave.
illustrated by Anna Sudit.
In the spring, the first daughter took on an official White House role as special assistant to the president — a move that inevitably caused some controversy. She also was the target of a class-action suit by Modern Appealing Clothing, a San Francisco-based luxury fashion boutique alleging that Ivanka's brand has an "unfair advantage" and sought to block her merchandise from being sold in the state of California.
illustrated by Anna Sudit.
Ivanka gave her first major interview since becoming first daughter, in which her definition of the term "complicit" caused quite a stir. ("Complicit" would go on to become the centerpiece of a Saturday Night Live spoof and Dictionary.com's word of the year.) She also flew to Germany to attend the W20 summit, her first international trip representing the White House. At the summit, she joined several female world leaders on a panel about women's entrepreneurship and was booed by the attendees.
illustrated by Anna Sudit.
May was a busy month for Ivanka: Her highly anticipated book Women Who Work came out, though she didn't promote it. The book debuted as a bestseller, but it was also met with brutal reviews. The eldest Trump daughter scored one of her first policy wins when her father's proposed budget included a paid family leave proposal. She also was part of President Trump's first foreign trip.
illustrated by Anna Sudit.
Ivanka participated in the White House's Workforce Development Week. She also was behind an executive order issued by her father that would increase federal spending on apprenticeships and job-training programs.
illustrated by Anna Sudit.
The first daughter traveled to the G20 summit in Germany with her father and other members of the Trump administration. There, she helped launch the Women Entrepreneurs Finance Initiative, a project created by the World Bank to help female entrepreneurs in developing countries. Ivanka also caused some controversy when she sat in for President Trump during one of the summit's sessions — though German Chancellor Angela Merkel later said it's common for members of delegations to sometimes sit in on meetings in place of world leaders. Later in the month she also met privately with the UN's Secretary-General António Guterres in New York City.
illustrated by Anna Sudit.
In August, the first daughter was criticized for supporting the Trump administration's decision to eliminate an Obama-era policy aimed at helping close the gender wage gap. Unlike President Trump, she denounced the violence in Charlottesville — though her silence on her father's controversial remarks didn't sit well with her critics.
illustrated by Anna Sudit.
Ivanka was the architect behind a presidential memorandum requiring the Department of Education to invest at least $200 million to prioritize STEM and computer science education in schools across the country. She also was in Detroit with a group of tech leaders who pledged $300 million in private contributions to help fund computer science education. Later that month, the first daughter and her husband Jared Kushner came under fire for reportedly using a private email address to conduct government work, though the White House stressed the communications happened when she wasn't a federal employee.
illustrated by Anna Sudit.
During an appearance at Fortune's Most Powerful Women Summit, the first daughter called for Congress to come up with a fix for Dreamers, the undocumented young people who were brought to the U.S. illegally as children. And even though she had been lobbying privately about expanding the child tax credit, in late October she pitched the credit and the Republican tax bill formally at Capitol Hill.
illustrated by Anna Sudit.
November was another whirlwind month for Ivanka: She traveled to Japan, where she gave a speech at a government-sponsored conference on women’s empowerment, and also to India, where she advocated for women's rights and economic empowerment at the Global Entrepreneurship Summit. The first daughter also addressed the child molestation allegations against Republican candidate Roy Moore, saying she believed his accusers. (Her father would go on to endorse Moore, who later was defeated in the Alabama special election.) Ivanka also defended former first daughter Malia Obama against some tabloid coverage.
illustrated by Anna Sudit.
The end of the year proved good for the first daughter. Congress passed the Republican tax bill, which among other things doubled the child tax credit — a major victory for Ivanka. She also kept pushing for her agenda on STEM education with a visit to software engineering students in Connecticut. And even though she is not in control of the organization anymore, the Ivanka Trump brand opened its second brick-and-mortar store in the U.S.