What The World's Top Google Searches Reveal About Trump's Win

Google searches in the months leading up to the election offered some interesting insights. They showed us the policies people were most curious about, and revealed a surge in searches on how to "move to Canada" after Donald Trump's "Super Tuesday" primary victories. They also led us to wonder if the large volume of Trump-related searches foreshadowed a win.

Of course, now we know the answer to that question. While no one — not even the polls — could have predicted Trump's shocking upset, Google searches before, during, and after an election can give you a sense of what people from all over the world are feeling and thinking.

Check out real-time searches here. Then, click through to see what people from the U.K. to Germany were googling as the votes rolled in and it became clear that "President Trump" was becoming a reality.

Photo: Google Trends/Twitter.
As surprising results started to roll in on Election Day, people began questioning the accuracy of exit polls.
Photo: Google Trends/Twitter.
The focus, not surprisingly remained on swing states including Florida, Pennsylvania, and Ohio in the hours leading up to polls closing.
Photo: Google Trends/Twitter.
Many people also sought early voting predictions from New Hampshire, a crucial swing state.
Photo: Google Trends/Twitter.
When Brexit became a reality in June, political researchers (and Dame Helen Mirren) warned that similarly shocking voting results could happen in America, with the election of Trump. In the hours after he became president-elect, focus shifted back towards the U.K.'s decision to leave the E.U.
Photo: Google Trends/Twitter.
People in the U.K. also wondered why more American citizens weren't wearing "I'm With Her" badges of support.
Photo: Google Trends/Twitter.
Yesterday, as the U.K. sought to learn more about Trump, people tellingly questioned how long we have until the next U.S. election.
Photo: Google Trends/Twitter.
Many of Germany's top Google searches pondered the same questions about the length of a presidential term in the U.S.
Photo: Google Trends/Twitter.
As people searched for answers about why the polls were so inaccurate, others asked a more obscure question: "How did this happen?"

Photo: Google Trends/Twitter.
Many "why did" searches skewed in Clinton's favor, as people wondered how Trump won and why voters supported him. (For those curious about the meaning of Hillary's purple pantsuit, look no further.)
Photo: Google Trends/Twitter.
"You will have successes and setbacks, too," Clinton said in her concession speech yesterday. "This loss hurts. But please, never stop believing that fighting for what's right is worth it."

Like much of the rest of the world, we, too, are wondering what her next steps will be, and how she will carry on that fight.
Photo: Google Trends/Twitter.
Clinton will likely win the popular vote; but she still lost the election because she didn't earn enough electoral votes. The Electoral College system is one that many speak out against, but that remains in place.
Photo: Google Trends/Twitter.
As the reality of Trump's win sunk in over the course of the day yesterday, searches turned to what it means now that he has won.
Photo: Google Trends/Twitter.
Confusion about Trump's in-office agenda has made "Who is Donald Trump?" a popular question.
Photo: Google Trends/Twitter.
The same goes for "What does Trump Pence mean?" as many in the U.K. struggle to make sense of how Trump's election will affect policies abroad.
Photo: Google Trends/Twitter.
Is humor the best medicine? Searches for funny Trump memes, from that cake to the voting-booth lean, implies there's some truth to the saying.