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Proenza Schouler Redefines The Working Girl

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    When the bass dropped to a remixed version of Missy Elliott’s “Work It” on Michel Gaubert’s track, we expected Jack McCollough and Lazaro Hernandez’s to werk it out. And, that’s exactly what we got. Fall Proenza pays homage to the new working girl. She’s powerful, strong, and, isn't afraid of anything — not of structured shoulders, architectural shapes, and definitely not flats. In fact, you won’t find a femme heel in this line — just luxe cross-over oxfords.

    While the collection features these menswear-esque pieces in innovative textures, luxurious fabrics, and most notably a myriad of speckle print and paint-swirl patterns in a myriad of colors, there’s something so deceptively simple and easy about the entire line (including the standout geometric cutout dresses, too). Something only Proenza seems to conquer season after season. Also noteworthy is Proenza's unexpected, yet effortlessly modern, way of mismatching — psychedelic-like frocks over those speckled long-sleeved tops and green, giraffe-stamped jackets over turtlenecks, paired with electrifying wood-grain pants.

    And, don’t worry, we would never speak Schouler without a mention of the bags. This season’s offerings — mainly clutches, shoulder styles, and top-handles — are as luxe as ever in vibrant-colored shearling and exotic skins. And, while normally we’d have to wait another six months to get our paws on them, Proenza must’ve heard our little fashion prayers because you can pre-order each runway piece today. Cue: freakout. Thanks, McCollough and Hernandez for introducing us to the woman we all want to be next fall — or you know, right now.

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