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Club Monaco's Got Your Back For The Easiest Fall Transition Imaginable

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    Summer may be all about just trying not to melt in your clothes, but once the temperatures drop, personal style has the chance to really flourish, layer by layer. Just in time for fall, Club Monaco, known for its casual-yet-elegant pieces, has released its newest lookbook, and it's chock-full of pieces that inspire us to embrace the seasonal shift.

    With selections that err on the more formal side, the lookbook includes structured camel coats, champagne-colored cashmere, flowing maxis, and fur-lined sweaters. If you've got a more relaxed, kicked-back POV — or perhaps planning your own autumn outdoor escape (apple picking, anyone?) — the chambray button-downs, plaid sweaters, and leather loafers are ideal.

    With loads of layers you can add or subtract, we can't help but adore this collection for its ability to transition seamlessly from humid heat to crisp, harvest temps. Start with a few standout staples now, then keep adding on the blazers, knits, and fur when the weather does finally break. You may never be stuck in a mid-season style rut again.

    Photo: Courtesy of Club Monaco

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