6 Things We Learned From The Hope Hicks Profile In New York Magazine

Former White House Communications Director Hope Hicks remains a sources of intrigue to many in and outside of Washington D.C. The famously media-shy 29-year-old was once the face of the Gossip Girl spinoff series It Girl and the preteen book series The Hourglass. She previously did public relations for the Trump Organization, later joining the Trump campaign. She was considered a loyal, right-hand woman to the president, with a desk near the Oval Office and access to Trump's ear few have.
In an interview with House of Representative lawmakers investigating Russia meddling in our presidential election Hicks revealed that she sometimes has to tell "white lies" for her boss.
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Shortly after that testimony and after questions were raised about the way Hicks handled the White House's initial denial of domestic abuse allegations against former aide Rob Porter, (who also happens to be her rumored boyfriend), Hicks announced she would resign. Still, questions remained about Hicks and her relationship with the president.
In a profile published over the weekend, New York Magazine’s Olivia Nuzzi gave a glimpse into Hick’s time inside 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue and hinted at what post White House life might have in store.
Ahead are a few of the intriguing, frightening and downright silly things we learned about the woman whom the president affectionately refers to as “Hopey!” and “Hopester!”
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“He doesn’t trust any men and never has. He doesn’t like men, you see. He has no male friends”

Trump "doesn't trust men"



A source told Nuzzi that the president, who has long faced accusations of sexual misconduct by multiple women and has a history of antagonizing women of color in particular, in fact has a problem with men.

“He doesn’t trust any men and never has. He doesn’t like men, you see. He has no male friends,” a source told Nuzzi. “But a small number of women, including his longtime assistant back in New York, he really listens to them — especially if he’s not banging them. Because, like a lot of men but more so, Trump really does compartmentalize the sex and the emotional part.”
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"He doesn’t like a woman that potentially has some position of power over him. He thinks women should be subservient to him."

John Kelly doesn't like powerful women



Unlike the president, Chief of Staff John Kelly reportedly has a problem with Hicks and with really any women who is not “subservient to him.”

"He would refer to her as ‘the high-schooler,’ he would joke about how she was inexperienced, she was in over her head, she was immature,” a former senior White House official told Nuzzi of Hicks’ relationship with Kelly. “He doesn’t like a woman that potentially has some position of power over him. He thinks women should be subservient to him. If you look at his relationship with Ivanka or Hope — women who aren’t subservient to him — he has problems with those people.”
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"When her apartment’s annual lease came up for renewal, she couldn’t bring herself to sign the papers."

Hicks had contemplated resigning — twice



Nuzzi reports that Hicks had considered leaving her post twice before. First, in early August 2017 she’d told friends Ivanaka Trump and Jared Kushner that she was unhappy but they’d convinced her to stay in the hopes that Chief of Staff John Kelly would bring order to the White House Chaos.

In early December, Nuzzi reports that Hicks again considered resigning going so far as to new her D.C. apartment lease for only six months.

"When her apartment’s annual lease came up for renewal, she couldn’t bring herself to sign the papers. Instead, she signed a six-month lease at a significant cost inflation," Nuzzi writes.
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“I’m sorry for everything you’ve been through.”

The President does know how to apologize



Throughout his nearly 14 months in the oval office Donald Trump has made a series of incendiary remarks--blaming “many sides” for racially motivated violence in Charlottesville,Va and referring to African nations ar Shithole countries” to name a few. Some argue these remarks would warrant an apology. Still, the words I’m sorry have not left his lips, at least not publically.

But Nuzzi’s reporting seems to suggest that The Donald does in fact know how to apologize. When Hick’s announced her resignation the president said he understood her decision and he hoped that she would one day return to the administration

"Then the president added something else," Nuzzi writes. “I’m sorry for everything you’ve been through.”
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“Each cookie package included a note she’d written in silver marker. “Believe in love,”

Hope Hicks baked cookies for the comms staff



Shortly after her resignation, Hicks saw fit to bring a sweet treat to her White House colleagues presumably for Valentines Day. She was photographed by the Daily Mail holding bags from Whole Foods.

Inside the bags, Nuzzi says, were the sugar cookies she’d baked and decorated with her mother to give to the communications staff.

“Each cookie package included a note she’d written in silver marker. 'Believe in love,' read one message. Underneath, she’d drawn a small heart.”
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In some ways, it seemed like he was not yet ready to think about what it would mean for her to be gone.”

Friendly reminder: Hicks is actually still in the White House



Nuzzi reported that Hicks identified May 1 as the latest she was willing to stay in the White House, though she prefered to leave by April 1 or before.

“When she spoke to the president about her plans to leave, she didn’t say specifically when that would be — and Trump didn’t ask, Nuzzi reported. “In some ways, it seemed like he was not yet ready to think about what it would mean for her to be gone.”
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