This Person's Tinder Poem Is So Cheesy It Actually Worked

In an effort to avoid generic opening lines on Tinder (shout out to all the "hey girl" people out there), some people have come up with quirky and creative openers to use in times when other words just fail, like when a profile tells you absolutely nothing about the person.
Sometimes, these quirky openers are eye-rollingly awful, but every once in a while, their extreme cheesiness actually pays off.
Luckily for a Reddit user who goes by Waster0fTime, their message fell into the second group. WasterofTime messaged a Tinder match using a bit of original poetry.
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"Roses are red, memes are dank, this is my opener, when profiles are blank," they wrote.
Instead of laughing them off, WasterofTime's match decided to roll with it — and to call them out for also not saying much in their profile. "Violets are blue, except that they're not, your profile might as well be blank, for all the personal info its got," the match responded.
The two messaged back and forth in rhyme for a while, and eventually ended up with this:
"Roses are red, I like how you think, you've got quite the talent, let me buy you a drink," the match wrote. Unfortunately, WasterofTime took it a little too far in their next message and said, "Roses are red, let's call it a date, if things go well, then maybe we'll mate?"
Yikes.
The match was clearly a little less impressed by this choice of rhyme, and not afraid to call WasterofTime out on it. "Roses are red, don't be that guy, at this rate you'll be lucky, for a quick kiss goodbye," they responded.
WasterofTime explained in their next verse that the suggestion that they mate wasn't serious — they were just looking for a word that rhymed with date and was able to turn it around by saying the two could "revisit it [the mating] at a more appropriate time."
Whether or not these two end up falling madly in love, the way we kind of hope every viral Tinder story ends, it will hopefully inspire some of us to be a little more creative with our messaging.
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