Kim Kardashian West Reportedly Directed Her Attorneys To Help Free A Sex Trafficking Survivor

Photo: Richard Shotwell/REX/Shutterstock.
Kim Kardashian West is acting on a promise she made on Twitter this week to a sex trafficking survivor convicted of murder, People reports.
Kardashian West promised to send her attorneys to assist Cyntoia Brown, a Tennesse woman who was tried as an adult for a murder she committed at 16, in 2004. She was found guilty of killing Johnny Mitchell Allen, a 43-year-old man who paid her to have sex with him. Brown is now 29 and serving a 60 year sentence, with no possibility of parole until she serves 51 of those years.
At her trial, Brown admitted to shooting Allen after they had intercourse. Her attorneys presented evidence that she suffered from physical, sexual, and verbal abuse and was a third generation survivor of abuse. Brown testified that she was regularly beaten, choked, dragged, raped, and threatened at gunpoint in her home while growing up, Newsweek reports.
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The Tennessean reported in 2016 that her case inspired a change in the state's law — now, only people aged 18 and up can be charged with prostitution, while persons under the legal age of consent are considered victims of sex trafficking.
Kardashian West's attorney, Shawn Holley, confirmed to The Blast that her client had instructed her to "find a way to help these women." Holley said the legal team has a call on Friday, November 24, to begin discussions with Brown's team about how they could help. Brown's case gained notoriety again this week, with tweets about it flying from multiple celebrities.

The justice system is so backwards!!! This is completely insane #freecyntoiabrown

A post shared by Cara Delevingne (@caradelevingne) on

In addition, Holley confirmed to The Blast that Kardashian West had instructed him to work with the legal team of 62-year-old Alice Johnson, who is serving a life sentence for her first time, non-violent drug conviction. In 2016, Johnson wrote an op-ed for CNN in which she asked then President Obama to commute the sentence of 231 other non-violent first time offenders.
"We have already contacted Alice Johnson and her team of lawyers who are now actively trying to find ways to facilitate her release," Holley said.
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