People Can't Get Over Weather Channel's New Storm Names

Even though official offices like the National Weather Service and National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration refrain from giving winter storms names, that doesn't stop Weather Channel from doing it. Every year since 2012, the network has offered up a list of names for the upcoming year's winter storms and Mashable reports that Twitter isn't happy with the selections this time.
Unlike trendy baby names, which can take inspiration from pop culture, Weather Channel's choices don't seem to have any clear pattern or predictability. Aiden is one of the most popular names around for actual children and it kicks off this year's list. Presented in alphabetical order, which is one way to keep track of how many storms are brewing in the ocean, the names run the gamut from ordinary (Noah) to retro (Polly) and quirky (Zoey).
Advertisement
Mashable calls the whole ordeal a marketing gimmick for the network, since the network gets credit when other news outlets use the storm names. Weather Channel says that its names help people prepare for impending danger. The unofficial list only applies to winter storms, however. Government agencies only name tropical storms and hurricanes.
While some might consider sharing a name with a natural disaster waiting to happen as an honor, one Wilbur is taking issue with his name's inclusion on the list. What's better, being associated with an anthropomorphized pig or an anthropomorphized storm? Wilbur doesn't like either.
Other Twitter users said that the names sounded like a group of angry moms or a cadre of hipster surrounding the only available outlet at a Starbucks. Another place old money gets first dibs? Apparently, storm names. 2017-18's options might lean too milquetoast for some, with Ethan, Hunter, and Grayson on the lineup.
Whatever people think of this year's collection, it's definitely better than 2015's list. That year, Weather Channel thought it would be a great idea to include Yolo as an option alongside Goliath, Zandor, and Vexo.
Read These Stories Next: