A Man Tried To Reclaim The Rainbow & It Did Not Go Well For Him

On Monday night, Ken Ham, president and founder of the Creation Museum, tweeted photos of the museum's sister attraction, a life-sized Noah's Ark, lit up in the colors of the rainbow.
That was all well and good, until Ham tried to reclaim the rainbow for God.
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Because marginalized people apparently don't suffer enough, they also have to deal with people like Ham, who seem think they've stolen their cultural symbols.
"Christians need to take back the rainbow as we do @ArkEncounter -God owns it-He decreed it's a sign of His covenant with man after the Flood," he tweeted.
He didn't stop there β€” Ham tweeted the same photo again late that night, writing, "The @ArkEncounter is lit permanently at night with a rainbow to remind the world that God owns the rainbow & is a sign of His covenant."
Ham may not have specifically mentioned LGBTQ people, but the implication was clear. Naturally, it didn't go down well on Twitter.
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Some pointed out that the ark may have always been giving us hints.
And one person posited the theory the boat is perhaps bisexual.
Either way, it's clear that the boat has become an icon in and of itself.
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News flash: Rainbows are a natural phenomenon, a refraction of light that occurs through water or a prism, and none of us technically "own" it. But all jokes aside, the rainbow is an important cultural symbol for LGBTQ people, with a long history in the gay rights movement.
Ham probably didn't expect his Twitter mentions to explode when he sent out those tweets, but then again, he also probably didn't see what happened the last time someone tried to "take back" the rainbow.
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