Jenny Slate Says The Media Tries To Control Every Aspect Of A Woman’s Life

Photo: Stewart Cook/REX/Shutterstock.
Jenny Slate is still getting used to the spotlight. Her performances in movies like Obvious Child and Landline have given her some well-deserved attention, but as much as she's enjoying the perks of fame, she opened up to Vanity Fair about the not-so-pleasant aspects of her success. Specifically, Slate has had trouble with the media, and how people who don't know her try to change her story — especially when it comes to romance.
"This is the first time in my adult life that I haven’t been in a relationship, that I’m just all alone, and I do whatever I like to do," she told Vanity Fair. "Because I’m a person who also likes to keep an eye on my mental health and my body health, I’ve treated myself nicely."
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The press, however, has other plans. Every aspect of her social life is scrutinized, and rumors have started flying about who she is and isn't possibly dating.
"For me, it connects to a very deep-seated belief within a patriarchal system," she explained. "If you’re a woman, the system actually owns your private life; the system has an opinion on your decisions; the system has a verdict on how you have sex and who you have sex with, and anything in between. For me, I am not open to that. I get really pissed about it, because it’s only my business."
However, Slate is totally okay talking about her romantic life when it's her decision. For instance, she recently opened up on the Talk Easy with Sam Fragoso podcast about a horrible blind date she had been on, in which her date turned up wearing chainmail.
"He comes around the corner inside the restaurant…this dude, and I’m not kidding, is dressed in full chainmail," she explained. "He’s got a full authentic knight’s costume on, including a floor-length tabard, which I called a tunic and then he corrected me and was like, 'It’s actually a tabard.'"
We totally want to respect Slate's privacy when it comes to her romantic life, but if she has any more stories like that, we're all ears.
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