A Food Network Host Just Revealed That She's Getting Surgery For A Breast Tumor

After a recent health scare, one food writer is reflecting on the work that she's put into being body-positive, and how her relationship with her body may change.
On Friday, Skyler Bouchard, a food writer who hosts "Sipping With Skyler" on Food Network's Snapchat, posted a photo to Instagram to reveal that she will be having surgery in order to remove a tumor that was found in her breast. Thankfully, the tumor is benign, but it's still caused Bouchard to pause and think about how this experience could affect her body.
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"Celebrating my pizza twins as I'm going into surgery to have a breast tumor removed today," she wrote. "Thankfully, it's benign. I can't stress my thanks to that enough. But I must say these past few weeks have been a whirlwind for me."

Celebrating my pizza twins as I'm going into surgery to have a breast tumor removed today. 🍕Thankfully, it's benign. I can't stress my thanks to that enough. 🙏 But I must say these past few weeks have been a whirlwind for me. As a 23-year old woman struggling with this, I've learned so much about how body image and self acceptance can be changed in an instant. Upon learning that part of my natural feminine identity was going to be chiseled away, torn apart, and sewn back together like a stuffed animal, I was devastated. Like many women, I had worked so hard to practice 100% body positivity and build "unbreakable" self confidence (of course, to some extent.. we all have our off days). I was at a point in my life where I truly looked in the mirror and loved what I saw. So that's why I was shocked to feel that sense of comfort fade away when my doctor told me I had to have a lumpectomy for a 5 cm tumor. He told me there is no telling for what I will look like after the removal, but it is a large mass. And after mourning over this "loss/change/all the terrible outcomes that could happen from a breast surgery," I realized that what I'm going through isn't even a sliver of what women who face breast cancer (or any form of cancer) are going through. My tumor is benign. I have to pinch my arm to remind myself that I am not going through a crisis. Cancer is a crisis. This makes me insecure and scared, but it's not a crisis. Going under the knife and having no idea what my body will look like after terrifies me, but if I want unbreakable self confidence, I have to come to terms with whatever I will look like after this. It may take some time, but luckily I have that. ❤

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"As a 23-year old woman struggling with this, I've learned so much about how body image and self acceptance can be changed in an instant," she wrote. "Upon learning that part of my natural feminine identity was going to be chiseled away, torn apart, and sewn back together like a stuffed animal, I was devastated."
Bouchard explained that she had worked hard to practice "100% body positivity," and to get to a point in her life where she looked in the mirror and truly loved what she saw.
"So that's why I was shocked to feel that sense of comfort fade away when my doctor told me I had to have a lumpectomy for a 5 cm tumor," she wrote. "He told me there is no telling for what I will look like after the removal, but it is a large mass."
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Of course, she's aware that what she might go through won't compare to going through cancer.
"I have to pinch my arm to remind myself that I am not going through a crisis," she wrote. "Cancer is a crisis. This makes me insecure and scared, but it's not a crisis."
Though not life-threatening, some non-cancerous tumors can be linked with a higher risk of breast cancer later on, according to the American Cancer Society. Bouchard's tumor may be benign, but that doesn't change the fact that her surgery is serious, and it'll take time to adjust to any changes her body will go through.
"Going under the knife and having no idea what my body will look like after terrifies me, but if I want unbreakable self confidence, I have to come to terms with whatever I will look like after this," she added. "It may take some time, but luckily I have that."
Refinery29 spoke to Bouchard following her surgery, and we're happy to report that the surgery went "exceptionally well."
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"Tumor excision is a minor surgery, so my chest wasn’t heavily bandaged," she told us. "I lifted up my gown and once I saw it I instantly began to cry because I was actually so happy. I had spent weeks dreading this moment and to look down and see something a bit different, a bit foreign, but still feel like myself was so refreshing. I also felt relieved that this surgery was over and I could now have the answer of what I would look like."
"I think a lot of my insecurities and fears were coming from the unknown and going under the knife not knowing how I will come out," she continued. "Even if the results hadn’t been as cosmetically appealing, I think I would still have felt relieved because it’s a moment of finally knowing what the future will face and how I would have to grasp this new image of myself. The anticipation was finally gone."
Though she told us that the anesthesia has lulled her appetite a bit, she's sure she'll be back to eating pizza soon.
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