This Blogger's Before-&-After Photos Make A Powerful Point About Eating Disorders

While most before-and-after photos showing someone's physical progress documents their journey towards weight loss or muscle gain, body positive blogger Megan Jayne Crabbe takes a different approach.
On Tuesday, Crabbe (who goes by bodyposipanda) posted two side-by-side photos of herself to Instagram, one "before" photo in which she is thinner, and a current photo of the "belly roll embracing woman I am today."
When she took the "before" photo, she wrote, she was struggling with anorexia β€” and now, she wants to show her followers that recovery is possible even when it seems so far out of reach. Crabbe also wrote that she hasn't shared a recovery photo in a while, because she doesn't want anyone to think that eating disorders have to "look" a certain way, but felt that it was important to celebrate her progress.
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It is possible to find beauty in the softness. It is possible to fall in love with a body that you never believed was worthy of love. It is possible to find peace after spending a lifetime waging war against your body. It is possible to recover. And if I can go from being the girl on the left, terrified, lost, completely consumed by anorexia, to the body positive, belly roll embracing woman I am today, then you can find peace too. πŸ’œπŸ’™πŸ’šπŸŒˆπŸŒž P.s. I haven't posted a recovery picture in a while, because I NEVER want you to think that you have to look like the picture on the left to have an eating disorder. You don't. EATING DISORDERS COME IN ALL SHAPES AND SIZES. And every single one is worthy of recognition and treatment. Eating disorders are mental illnesses, not sizes. But today I realised that it's nearly 10 years since I was first diagnosed with anorexia. 10 years on, and I'm about to finish writing a book teaching other people how to make peace with their bodies. I didn't even think that I was going to make it out alive, let alone make it to where I am now. So this is to show that girl on the left how powerful she really is. This is to show her everything that she was capable of. This is to show her that she survived, and not only that, she thrived. I wish I could go back and show her that she had the power to do anything in the whole world all along. So this will have to do. And to everyone who's still fighting, this is to tell you that I believe in you. πŸ’œ #bodypositivepower

A post shared by Megan Jayne Crabbe 🐼 (@bodyposipanda) on

"I NEVER want you to think that you have to look like the picture on the left to have an eating disorder," she wrote. "You don't. EATING DISORDERS COME IN ALL SHAPES AND SIZES. And every single one is worthy of recognition and treatment. Eating disorders are mental illnesses, not sizes."
"But today I realised that it's nearly 10 years since I was first diagnosed with anorexia," she continued. "10 years on, and I'm about to finish writing a book teaching other people how to make peace with their bodies. I didn't even think that I was going to make it out alive, let alone make it to where I am now."
According to the National Association of Anorexia, at least 30 million people in the U.S. suffer from an eating disorder, and an estimated 0.9% of women in America suffer from anorexia at some point in their lives.
Crabbe has made remarkable progress in the last decade, but she wants to make sure that people understand that eating disorders don't often manifest physically, and you don't have to be thin to struggle with one. Instead, she wants her followers to know that no matter how your eating disorder manifests itself, it is possible to recover and to love your body again.
This isn't the first time Crabbe has opened up about her journey β€” and thankfully, it likely won't be the last. Crabbe has continued to be a positive, powerful voice in the body positive community on her website and Instagram page, and she'll also be releasing a book on how she learned to treat her body better.
If you are struggling with an eating disorder and are in need of support, please call the National Eating Disorders Association Helpline at 1-800-931-2237. For a 24-hour crisis line, text β€œNEDA” to 741741.
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