Mad Men Star's Newborn Son's Death Leaves Unanswered Questions

Photo: J. Countess/WireImage.
In May 2016, British actor Jamie King — of Mad Men and The Tudors fame — and his wife, actress Tamara Podemski, tragically lost their newborn son to brain damage. After months of unanswered questions and alleged suspect behavior from the hospital, the investigation was dropped yesterday.
“We are deeply shocked to learn from the press that the police investigation has now been closed, especially since the RUH [Royal United Hospital] had promised to keep us informed of all developments regarding this very serious matter,” King said in a statement, according to the Daily Mail. “Our solicitor has petitioned for them to provide us with the results of their internal investigation, as well as the findings of the police report.”
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In May 2016, Podemski was rushed to the Royal United Hospital for an emergency C-section. This was one day after being turned away for her scheduled cesarean. “They ignored our objections and they sent us home,” King said, according to The Guardian. “We believed them when they said it was safe to go home, but it is now very clear that we should have never been sent home that night.”
Their son, Benjamin King, passed away only five days after his birth, according to The Telegraph. Amid a laundry list of questions surrounding the incident and how the hospital handled the birth, an investigation began shortly after.
It was revealed that their son was without oxygen for two hours. According to some, had the infant been born during the scheduled procedure the day before, this would not have happened. The doctors have stood by their decision.
“Benjamin King’s mother attended hospital on May 4. It was a high-risk pregnancy,” the coroner said. “She was 14 days overdue and there had been an antenatal trace which was abnormal. Benjamin’s birth was appropriately planned as a category three C-section for that day. A decision was made to delay that delivery to the following day. This decision, together with the decision to send his mum home, resulted in Benjamin being born in a poor condition and his subsequent death.”
In November it was alleged that the National Health Service had tampered with "crucial" evidence. That evidence included statements from staff.
“We are unable to comment further, except to say that we continue to be very hurt and disappointed by the RUH's profound lack of respect and consideration for our needs as grieving parents,” King said.
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