You've Been Singing These Song Lyrics Wrong Your Whole Life

Photo: RMV/REX/Shutterstock.
A single tweet is about to forever alter your memories of your adolescence.

On Sunday, a 20-year-old New Yorker by the name of Raquel shared a photo of the booklet from Panic! At the Disco's 2005 album A Fever You Can't Sweat Out. An arrow points toward one line from the single "I Write Sins Not Tragedies": "Haven't you people ever heard of closing a goddamn door?"

Nope, not "the goddamn door." "A goddamn door." Sounds weird, right?

And it changes the line's meaning, albeit subtly. Rather than accusing the adulterous bride described in the song of failing to close the door, Brendon Urie, Ryan Ross, and Spencer Smith are accusing her of not even understanding how to close a door. Way harsh.
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This revelation so shook Raquel that she had to conduct her own experiment before she believed the booklet. "When I found out about the actual lyrics, I played it a cappella on YouTube and slowed it down to see if it actually was 'a,' and it is," told BuzzFeed News. "And my brain just couldn’t get that. I still refuse to accept it."

You and us all, Raquel. Twitter's collectively gone into denial.
But Urie believes we're all overreacting, calling the distinction "some Berenstein/Berenstain shit" and reassuring us that both variations do the song justice.
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